ISL: 10-man Jamshedpur FC edge past Odisha FC 2-1 in thrilling tie

first_imgA 10-man Jamshedpur FC overcame the odds and put up a spirited fight to defeat Odisha FC 2-1 in an Indian Super League (ISL) match at the JRD Tata Sports Complex in Jamshedpur on Tuesday.Farukh Choudhary broke the deadlock in the 17th minute fortuitously, but the lead was put in danger by a red card that Bikash Jairu picked up with 10 minutes to go for the half-time whistle.Aridane Santana stuck soon after to restore parity for Odisha FC but a fighting second-half culminated in Sergio Castel finding a winner in the 85th minute for the hosts.The teams looked to get on the scoresheet early and it were Odisha FC that threatened first.Xisco Hernandez fed Jerry Mawhmingthanga down the right flank and the winger’s floating cross was headed just wide by Aridane Santana.Odisha continued to push and went close again four minutes later. Xisco split the Jamshedpur defence to send Jerry free down the right flank but the former Jamshedpur winger’s curling effort ricocheted off the post.Fortune, however, favoured Jamshedpur as they eased into a one-goal lead in the 17th minute. Noe Acosta found Farukh Choudhary in space on the right flank and the Indian forward’s drilled effort into the box took a deflection off defender Rana Gharami and bulged the net.Jamshedpur bossed the midfield after scoring the opening goal but Odisha’s efforts to get back into the game were helped by a straight red card for Bikash Jairu. With Jerry getting in behind the defence and having just the goalkeeper to beat in the 35th minute, Jairu slid in and brought the 22-year-old down.advertisementThe visitors made the most of the one-man advantage and equalised five minutes later. Jerry was influential again as he sent a low cross into the centre from the right for Santana who produced a stunning first-time strike to silence the home crowd.Odisha had more of the ball after the break, utilising the space that was opened up due to the sending off. However, there were chances created at both ends of the field.Santana set Nandhakumar Sekar up perfectly inside the box after a neat one-two but Joyner Lourenco’s timely intervention denied the visitors a shot on target. Jamshedpur then found themselves in a two-on-one attacking scenario but Farukh’s cross, intended for Castel in the centre, was cut off by Shubham Sarangi just in time.The game was stretched and the teams found space on counter-attacks. Farukh missed a glorious chance to score in one such speedy push forward as Piti lobbed the ball into space for Sergio Castel to chase. The striker squared it to the India forward who wrongly chose to return the favour and lost the ball.A 10-man Jamshedpur were finally rewarded for their resilience in the 85th minute. Piti found Castel in space once again on the counter and the striker dinked the ball over onrushing goalkeeper Francisco Dorronsoro to net what turned out to be the crucial match-winner.last_img read more

California district stalls West drought plan over lake money

FLAGSTAFF, Ariz. — A California irrigation district with the highest-priority rights to Colorado River water is using its power to demand federal funds to restore the state’s largest lake, hoping to capitalize on one of its best opportunities to tackle a long-standing environmental and human health hazard.The Imperial Irrigation District wants $200 million for the Salton Sea, a massive, briny lake in the desert southeast of Los Angeles created when the Colorado River breached a dike in 1905 and flooded a dry lake bed. The money would help create habitat for migratory birds and suppress dust in communities with high rates of asthma and respiratory illnesses.The district says that if the federal government doesn’t commit to giving California the money, it won’t sign off on a multistate plan to preserve the river’s two largest reservoirs amid a prolonged drought.“There have been various plans over the decades for the Salton Sea, and none of them have been built,” said Michael Cohen of the Pacific Institute, who studies the lake. “This most recent effort is a huge priority.”A nearly two-decade-long drought has drained Lake Mead and Lake Powell to alarmingly low levels. The seven Western states that rely on the Colorado River have been working on a plan to keep the lakes from being unable to deliver water at all.In the lower basin, the drought plan would mean voluntary and more widespread cuts for Nevada, California and Arizona.The plan has hinged at various points on the latter two states.The Gila River Indian Community, a key player in Arizona’s negotiations, threatened to pull out of the plan if the speaker of the state House advanced a bill the tribe said would undermine its water rights. The tribe now says it has the reassurance it needs to provide much of the water Arizona requires to soften losses for other users in the state. Arizona as a whole, though, said it’s moving at its own pace on more than a dozen agreements that need to be signed among water users in the state.The situation in California remains shaky.The state last year secured $200 million in a voter-approved ballot measure to work on the first phase of a Salton Sea plan.The plan would create thousands of acres of bird habitat and help control dust that blows through the Coachella and Imperial valleys, creating a health hazard for residents.No one expects to restore the Salton Sea to its former glory. In its heyday in the 1950s and ’60s, the lake was a major recreation area, frequented by boaters, anglers and even Hollywood celebrities.It was fed primarily by runoff but has been evaporating more quickly since San Diego’s regional water agency stopped sending it water. Inflow to the lake has decreased to 900,000 acre-feet annually, about one-third less than 15 years ago, Cohen said. An acre-foot is enough to serve one to two households a year.Any action taken through the drought plan to preserve Lake Mead on the Arizona-Nevada border or Lake Powell on the Arizona-Utah line must take into account the crisis at the Salton Sea, said James Hanks, who sits on the Imperial Irrigation District’s board of directors.“IID has worked to be a good neighbour on the river,” Hanks said at a recent meeting. “Yet, a sustainable solution to declining flows cannot and will not be attained at the continuous and severe expense of the Imperial Valley and the Salton Sea, while other agencies intend to grow their supply off of a shrinking system.”The irrigation district has something else to gain from the drought plan: the ability to store huge amounts of water behind Lake Mead for later use because it doesn’t have its own long-term storage reservoirs.The district is seeking a funding commitment for the Salton Sea ahead of a March 4 deadline set by U.S. Bureau of Reclamation Commissioner Brenda Burman for Arizona and California to complete work on the drought plan. Without a plan, Burman said she will turn to governors in the river basin states — Arizona, California, Colorado, Nevada, New Mexico, Utah and Wyoming — for a solution.But she said late last week she remained hopeful all the states soon will finish negotiations, and legislation implementing the drought plan will be introduced in Congress so it can take effect this year.The Coachella Valley Water District board joined other California water managers in approving in-state agreements earlier this month. But there’s a caveat: Everyone signs the full plan or no one signs. Imperial wants to see the full package before it takes a final vote.Hanks said the Imperial board won’t tolerate threats by the Reclamation Bureau, which has broad, unspecified authority over the drought plan. He said he doubted the agency could violate the priority system on the river.The Imperial Irrigation District is the largest single recipient of Colorado River water, with 3.1 million-acre feet of California’s 4.4 million-acre entitlement under legal compacts stretching back nearly a century.The Imperial Valley grows much of the nation’s winter vegetables, and the irrigation district also serves several cities.Burman declined to talk about the Salton Sea funding on a recent call with reporters but said the federal government has been a strong partner in efforts to protect the lake. The land it sits on is a mix of state, federal and private ownership, but California has main responsibility for the declining lake under a 2003 landmark accord that quantified Colorado River water in the state.Bruce Wilcox, assistant secretary for Salton Sea policy at California’s Natural Resources Agency, said the long-term goal for the 375-square-mile (971-square-kilometre) lake is that it’s self-sustainable after it stabilizes around the year 2030.“Right now, the system we’re building requires a fair amount of human intervention,” he said.The Imperial Irrigation District recently wrote to the U.S. Department of Agriculture asking for the $200 million to be delivered through the latest farm bill, and those talks are continuing, the district said. Language in the bill made the Salton Sea eligible for federal funding for drought-related problems. California U.S. Sen. Dianne Feinstein also has been pushing the Trump administration to implement the provisions.Using the drought plan as leverage isn’t without precedent.Earlier, southern California’s Metropolitan Water District said it would be difficult to support the plan without another water source. The agency has pushed for two tunnels to be built under Sacramento-San Joaquin Delta in Northern California to ship water south. California Gov. Gavin Newsom said last week he would support one tunnel.Central Arizona farmers also have said they want a guarantee of federal funding for groundwater infrastructure they increasingly will rely on as they get moved off Colorado River water.“It’s not just IID,” Cohen said.Felicia Fonseca, The Associated Press read more