News / Hellmann the last to settle as New York freight forwarding antitrust case ends

first_imgBy Alex Lennane 02/03/2016 In October, companies involved in the second round of settlements, including Agility and UPS, had agreed to pay a total of $197.6m. It followed a first round, which brought the shippers $112m.The shippers had alleged that, shortly after the terrorist attacks, the freight forwarders had conspired to pass on additional security surcharges to their customers by agreeing to “fix, inflate and maintain” surcharges for US freight forwarding services. They alleged that the agreement involved all new surcharges from carriers. The last remaining defendant in the antitrust case in New York, brought by shippers against forwarders, has settled for a relatively diminished amount of $550,000.Hellmann Worldwide Logistics has effectively ended the class action with its one-time payment.The claimants said the international freight forwarding industry had conspired to fix prices after the September 11 2001 terrorist attacks in New York.DHL Express USA was the penultimate defendant to settle, after it agreed to pay out $53m in December. Hellmann had reached a deal, in principle, with the shippers at the end of last year.last_img read more

Fake Eventbrite account charging people for COVID-19 vaccine registrations

first_imgPASCO COUNTY, Fla. – A fake Eventbrite account was found to have been charging people in Pasco and Pinellas counties for COVID-19 vaccine registrations, according to health officials.The counties released a statement saying people should not be charged for registration when they go online to book an appointment, stressing that registration is free.Officials were informing those trying to make an appointment that the only way to register is through the health department websites, according to local NBC affiliate WFLA.The Department of Health in Collier County is also using Eventbrite for people to book their vaccine registrations. AdvertisementDC Young Fly knocks out heckler (video) – Rolling OutRead more6 comments’Mortal Kombat’ Exceeded Expectations Says WarnerMedia ExecutiveRead more2 commentsDo You Remember Bob’s Big Boy?Read more1 commentsKISS Front Man Paul Stanley Reveals This Is The End Of KISS As A Touring Band, For RealRead more1 comments RELATEDTOPICS Advertisement Amazon distribution center officially opens in Collier County June 16, 2021 AdvertisementTags: collier countyEventbritePasco CountyPinellas County AdvertisementWithin one hour of opening up registrations on Dec. 30, all appointments in Collier County had already been sold out on Eventbrite.NBC2 has not received reports of fake Eventbrite accounts being created in Collier County.center_img Collier school resource officers teach kids how to fish on first day of “Summerfest” June 16, 2021 Wounded Warriors organization accuses City of Naples of discrimination June 16, 2021 AdvertisementRecommended ArticlesBrie Larson Reportedly Replacing Robert Downey Jr. As The Face Of The MCURead more81 commentsGal Gadot Reportedly Being Recast As Wonder Woman For The FlashRead more29 comments Mosquitoes swarming Collier County, crews trap 25,000 in two nights June 17, 2021 Advertisementlast_img read more

Brian Moss: Twitter, Cheddar, Nurses and some good news at last

first_img By Brian Moss – 4th December 2020 Pinterest Brian Moss: Twitter, Cheddar, Nurses and some good news at last Electric Picnic Twitter Home Columnists Brian Moss: Twitter, Cheddar, Nurses and some good news at last Columnists Electric Picnic apply to Laois County Council for new date for this year’s festival Old Fashioned Positive News2020 has changed the word positive into being, well, a very negative one but as 2020 hurtles to an end (thankfully) it looks like some old school positively good news is on the horizon.This week’s news that the UK have authorised the world’s first vaccine roll-out will be one of those moments that will feature in the 2020 Reeling in the Years episode.Ireland, as part of the EU collective, is likely to follow in the coming weeks.As a guest said to me on the radio recently, what we can look forward to in 2021 is drip drips of good news as opposed to the torrent of bad during 2020.Incrementally over the next few months as we crawl slowly back to hopefully a newer, better version of normal we’ll have little good news milestones every other week along the way.Perhaps it could be your local cafe reopening fully, the local cinema screening blockbusters again and folk being able to gather together for a well-earned pint in bars whether they be of the  wet or dry variety.These are the little baby steps we can hopefully look forward to  in the early days of 2021.Now if only the scientists could also create a real life memory stick ala the Men In Black movies so as to forget 2020 completely! WhatsApp Facebook A Tweet is a long time in politicsWhen a politician is making the news for a tweet it’s never for  something good, and so it was the case this week for  Laois/Offaly Sinn Fein TD Brian Stanley decided to tweet in apparent support  of  The Kilmichael Ambush and The Warrenpoint bombings.Ambushes it should be remembered that claimed the lives of nearly 40 British soldiers, many of whom were young men  in their late teens or early 20s.As a lover of Irish history I managed to visit the site of the Kilmichael Ambush during the summer (between lockdowns before you ask).It had been on my historical bucket list visit for quite some time. For most the feeling you get there isn’t one of celebration, it’s one of acknowledgemt of darker days and the awful waste that wars and conflicts bring regardless of your support of the cause or not.The same goes for Warrenpoint, one of the darkest days in our history.There is nothing to celebrate here or anywhere lives were lost, there is a world of difference between commemoration and celebration, regardless of what side you fall on.Mr Stanley has apologised unreservedly for the ill conceived tweet and as someone who hates cancel culture I hope that this is the end of it, not least because having a Laois TD as chair of the hugely influential public accounts committee is no bad thing.But this latest political tweetgate couldn’t come at a worse time for Sinn Fein.The party under the leadership of Mary Lou McDonald is surging in opinion polls.Their key to electoral victory is convincing the non-traditional Sinn Fein voter that they, as a party, have evolved from the dark days of the troubles, that they are fit to lead a government  in this state.Spearheaded by the very capable McDonald Sinn Fein’s front bench has undoubted ability and more and more is looking like a government in waiting.But tweets like this drag the past back to the present and may well make those all important soft Sinn Fein voters possibly  reconsider where they place their no 1 come election time.Safe pair of handsI think even the most ardent of non Liverpool fans (and I’m aware there are many) would be heartened by the performance of Corks Caoimhe Kelleher‏ between the sticks for the Reds during the week.The Cork-born stopper was excellent on his Champions League debut and with Liverpool’s No. 1 Allison out for the weekend’s Premier League fixtures it could mean that we see a bit more of Kelleher over the coming weeks.No matter who your Premier League side is, it’s great to see an Irish man playing at the very top level and if Kelleher‏ can put a string of games together at Anfield he could well be pushing for the No 1 jersey for the boys in green which can only be a plus!Call The Nurse … and pay themAs we know the government pays a lot of money to spin doctors to help them get their message out and to avoid, as much as possible, political fumbles but sometimes you’ve just got to wonder how our governments can score so many own goals.This week the three government parties voted down a motion brought by People Before Profit to reinstate pay for student nurses and midwives on placement.If ever there was a time to recognise the work of medical students a global pandemic would be it!Yes it’s part of their college course to get practical experience but given the dangers associated with being in medical surroundings this simple gesture, which would not break the bank, would  be a big win for a government that is starved of good news stories.Even if it were to cover day to day expenses, some sort of pay for students on placements in hospitals and medical centres is the right thing to do.You don’t need to be a brain surgeon to know that!Management Merry Go RoundTo be fair to the Laois GAA County Board they have wasted little time in filling the vacant chair at the top of Laois hurling.As reported by LaoisToday, Cheddar Plunkett is set to return as hurling manager, a position he brought a lot of success to between 2012 and 2016The appointment is a smart one. Cheddar has proven pedigree at the top level and has the respect of the hurling community which is a must for the position and hopefully this can put the negativity surrounding the departure of Eddie Brennan to rest.Brennan for his part has taken up a coaching role with Dublin kingpins Cuala, an equally smart appointment by the Dublin side.Next year in many ways is  a make or break one for Laois. This year was about consolidating their work in getting promotion and mixing with the elite’s of the games. The next step is to not just be competitive for most of the game but to start to get some wins on board at this level.Hopefully Cheddar and his team can be the ones to do it.You can catch Brian Moss on Midlands 103’s The Late Shift on Monday, Tuesday and Wednesday nights from 10pm to 12 midnight and Saturdays on The Saturday Beat from 5pm to 9pm. Follow him on Twitter here.SEE ALSO – Love Laois: A list of local restaurants now open as restrictions ease Facebook Laois Councillor ‘amazed’ at Electric Picnic decision to apply for later date for 2021 festival Pinterest Previous articleHigh praise as Laois woman honoured at national Volunteer Ireland awardsNext articleMary Lou requests Brian Stanley to take week off and Taoiseach rows in as Twitter controversy drags on Brian Moss WhatsApp Electric Picnic RELATED ARTICLESMORE FROM AUTHOR Twitter Electric Picnic Electric Picnic organisers release statement following confirmation of new festival date last_img read more

Samjiyon again put under lockdown over COVID-19 fears

first_img SHARE News Facebook Twitter North Korea Market Price Update: June 8, 2021 (Rice and USD Exchange Rate Only) AvatarLee Chae Un RELATED ARTICLESMORE FROM AUTHOR Hamhung man arrested for corruption while working at a state-run department store center_img The city of Samjiyon, in Yanggang Province, has again been put under lockdown over COVID-19 fears, Daily NK has learned.The central government ordered the lockdown on Mar. 3, according to a source in the province Daily NK spoke with yesterday.The source said that the lockdown order was due to an “illegal border crossing” and is aimed at preventing the spread of COVID-19.Samjiyon work units rumorsA panorama view of Samjiyon County, Yanggang Province. / Image: Rodong SinmunThe lockdown order has closed all organizations in the city, except for law enforcement-related agencies, and prohibited all gatherings and movements of people in the city. The order also included a directive for people “not to leave their houses.”The lockdown order further shutdown local markets “for the time being” and has prohibited the entry of all vehicles transporting food from outside of the city. There have subsequently been concerns that commodity prices may spike as a result of this measure.The authorities have not presented a specific period in which the lockdown order is to remain in effect.There is the possibility that the authorities will soon downgrade the lockdown order as they have recently done in Hyesan.North Korean authorities handed down lockdown orders in Aug. 2020 and in January of this year due to “illegal border crossing” incidents.Please direct any comments or questions about this article to [email protected] in Korean News News North Korea hikes “party contributions” Russia-based workers must pay by 30-55%last_img read more

More foreign workers approved as first flight arrives from Fiji

first_imgMore foreign workers approved as first flight arrives from Fiji The NSW Government has provided approval for a further 160 critical workers to arrive from either the Soloman Islands, Tonga or Vanuatu to assist the labour-intensive tomato industry, Minister for Agriculture Adam Marshall announced today.The 160 workers are in addition to the 350 skilled workers announced last month to help fill a labour shortage in the State’s abattoirs.Mr Marshall said the NSW Government was doing everything it could to help facilitate the arrival of foreign workers to minimise supply chain disruption caused by labour shortages due to COVID-19 international travel restrictions.“The first group of foreign workers arrives today from Fiji and will immediately enter strict hotel quarantine,” Mr Marshall said.“Once they have completed quarantine, they will be able to travel to our regional centres and take up their roles in our abattoirs.“As we come into the festive season, we know there will be strong demand for fantastic NSW meats.“By helping to facilitate the arrival of these foreign workers, we are helping to take pressure off the supply chain to make sure everyone can enjoy a Christmas roast.“Similarly, once Commonwealth approval is secured, the extra 160 foreign workers will be able to give us a hand to harvest our tomato crop.“The tomato industry is worth more than $50 million to the State’s economy, so by providing support to the sector we also give also our rural communities that rely on its success a boost.“We will continue to work hand in glove with the agriculture sector to explore other opportunities,” Mr Marshall said.The facilitation of foreign workers is in addition to implementing the National Agricultural Workers’ Code and launching the Help Harvest NSW portal to connect domestic labour supply with demandThe charter flights and quarantine arrangements are funded by industry. /Public Release. This material comes from the originating organization and may be of a point-in-time nature, edited for clarity, style and length. View in full here. Why?Well, unlike many news organisations, we have no sponsors, no corporate or ideological interests. We don’t put up a paywall – we believe in free access to information of public interest. Media ownership in Australia is one of the most concentrated in the world (Learn more). Since the trend of consolidation is and has historically been upward, fewer and fewer individuals or organizations control increasing shares of the mass media in our country. According to independent assessment, about 98% of the media sector is held by three conglomerates. This tendency is not only totally unacceptable, but also to a degree frightening). Learn more hereWe endeavour to provide the community with real-time access to true unfiltered news firsthand from primary sources. It is a bumpy road with all sorties of difficulties. We can only achieve this goal together. Our website is open to any citizen journalists and organizations who want to contribute, publish high-quality insights or send media releases to improve public access to impartial information. You and we have the right to know, learn, read, hear what and how we deem appropriate.Your support is greatly appreciated. All donations are kept completely private and confidential.Thank you in advance!Tags:Agriculture, commonwealth, coronavirus, covid-19, Economy, Fiji, Government, hotel, industry, Minister, New South Wales, NSW, NSW Department of Primary Industries, season, supply chain, Tonga, travel, Vanuatu:last_img read more

NSW Government set to support communities for NAIDOC Week 2021

first_imgNSW Government set to support communities for NAIDOC Week 2021 Minister of StateThe NSW Government is gearing up to support community-led and COVID-safe NAIDOC Week events across the state in 2021, with applications now open for funding for the 4 – 11 July celebrations.Minister for Aboriginal Affairs Don Harwin said that large or small, each celebration makes an important contribution to communities across NSW.“NAIDOC Week is a significant time in Australia, and I’m lucky to have seen first-hand the passion that communities across the state put into sharing and celebrating our ancient culture and diversity,” Mr Harwin said.“Having helped communities to successfully stage a range of COVID-safe celebrations last year, including fun days, arts projects and online experiences, we’re confident of being able to support these again in 2021.“Now is the time to start planning for July’s events, and I encourage communities to take up this opportunity.”The NAIDOC Grants program is an initiative administered by Aboriginal Affairs NSW that aims to celebrate Aboriginal history, culture and achievements during NAIDOC Week.Through a variety of grants, ranging from $500 to $3000, eligible organisations are supported to promote greater awareness and understanding of Aboriginal history and culture within their broader local or regional community. /Public Release. This material comes from the originating organization and may be of a point-in-time nature, edited for clarity, style and length. View in full here. Why?Well, unlike many news organisations, we have no sponsors, no corporate or ideological interests. We don’t put up a paywall – we believe in free access to information of public interest. Media ownership in Australia is one of the most concentrated in the world (Learn more). Since the trend of consolidation is and has historically been upward, fewer and fewer individuals or organizations control increasing shares of the mass media in our country. According to independent assessment, about 98% of the media sector is held by three conglomerates. This tendency is not only totally unacceptable, but also to a degree frightening). Learn more hereWe endeavour to provide the community with real-time access to true unfiltered news firsthand from primary sources. It is a bumpy road with all sorties of difficulties. We can only achieve this goal together. Our website is open to any citizen journalists and organizations who want to contribute, publish high-quality insights or send media releases to improve public access to impartial information. You and we have the right to know, learn, read, hear what and how we deem appropriate.Your support is greatly appreciated. All donations are kept completely private and confidential.Thank you in advance!Tags:Aboriginal, Arts, Australia, community, culture, Government, grants program, Internet, Minister, New South Wales, NSW, onlinelast_img read more

Canada and FCM invest in asset management in a community in Yukon

first_imgCanada and FCM invest in asset management in a community in Yukon From: Infrastructure CanadaWith funding from MAMP, the Village of Carmacks will conduct a detailed inspection and assessment of assets and a review of current and historical maintenance practices and competencies. These will be used to develop an updated asset management plan that incorporates the more detailed condition assessment insights to build on the existing Asset Management Plan. This would focus on assessing lifecycle needs and required investment in both operating and capital. In future phases of this work, it would incorporate the developed maintenance plans into the Asset Management Plan.This is why the Government of Canada is investing $50,000 in a new project in a Yukon community through the Municipal Asset Management Program (MAMP), delivered by the Federation of Canadian Municipalities (FCM) on behalf of the federal government. The program helps municipalities strengthen local infrastructure planning and decision-making by increasing local asset management capacity through investments in activities such as asset management training, technology and software enhancements and information sharing.With funding from MAMP, the Village of Carmacks will conduct a detailed inspection and assessment of assets and a review of current and historical maintenance practices and competencies. These will be used to develop an updated asset management plan that incorporates the more detailed condition assessment insights to build on the existing Asset Management Plan. This would focus on assessing lifecycle needs and required investment in both operating and capital. In future phases of this work, it would incorporate the developed maintenance plans into the Asset Management Plan.Quotes“The project announced today ensures the Village of Carmacks has the tools and technology necessary to make well-informed decisions for the long term. We’re proud to invest in infrastructure asset management projects that will help communities grow their local economy and improve residents’ quality of life.”The Honourable Catherine McKenna, Minister of Infrastructure and Communities“Rural communities are the backbone of the Canadian economy and among the best places in Canada to call home. Smart investments in infrastructure help smaller communities to grow, strengthen their economies and improve quality of life for their residents. Through projects like the one announced today, our government is helping to ensure that local leaders, especially those in rural areas, have the tools they need to plan for the long-term and creating stronger rural communities now and for generations to come.”The Honourable Maryam Monsef, Minister for Women and Gender Equality and Rural Economic Development“The Government of Canada, through programs like the Municipal Asset Management Program, continues to put a major focus on supporting Yukon’s municipal Governments. With this announcement today, the Village of Carmacks will be able to assess their existing assets and be in a better position for community planning, and future development.”The Honourable Larry Bagnell, Member of Parliament for Yukon“Through the Municipal Asset Management Program, FCM continues to help municipalities of all sizes, especially small and rural, manage municipal infrastructure and make stronger investment decisions based on reliable data. FCM supports communities from coast to coast to coast by providing funding, training, and resources to develop sustainable solutions that work and improve the quality of life for residents.”Joanne Vanderheyden, President, Federation of Canadian MunicipalitiesQuick factsThe $110-million Municipal Asset Management Program, delivered by the Federation of Canadian Municipalities and funded by the Government of Canada, has invested in more than 962 municipal asset management projects.MAMP offers funding, training, and resources to help municipalities strengthen their asset management practices thereby enabling them to make informed infrastructure investment decisions.To support Canadians and communities during the COVID-19 pandemic, a new stream has been added to the over $33-billion Investing in Canada Infrastructure Program to help fund pandemic-resilient infrastructure. Existing program streams have also been adapted to include more eligible project categories.The COVID-19 Resilience Stream will help other orders of governments whose finances have been significantly impacted by the pandemic by increasing the federal cost share for public infrastructure projects in a variety of areas including disaster mitigation and adaptation projects and pandemic-resilient infrastructure.Furthermore, the Canada Healthy Communities Initiative will provide up to $31 million in existing federal funding to help communities adapt spaces and services in response to immediate and ongoing coronavirus-related needs over the next two years.Over the past five years, the Government of Canada has invested over $850 million through the Investing in Canada Plan in over 250 projects across Yukon.Since 2016, the federal government has invested $28 billion in over 18,000 infrastructure projects in communities with populations under 100,000. More than 6,100 kilometres of highways and roads, and 103 bridges have been built, repaired or upgraded in rural communities, and more than 3,134 projects are providing rural communities with access to cleaner, more sustainable sources of drinking water.The federal Gas Tax Fund (GTF) is designed to provide municipalities with a stable and predictable source of funding. In 2020-21, Yukon has received $16.5 million through the federal GTF to fund their most pressing infrastructure needs. /Public Release. This material comes from the originating organization and may be of a point-in-time nature, edited for clarity, style and length. View in full here. Why?Well, unlike many news organisations, we have no sponsors, no corporate or ideological interests. We don’t put up a paywall – we believe in free access to information of public interest. Media ownership in Australia is one of the most concentrated in the world (Learn more). Since the trend of consolidation is and has historically been upward, fewer and fewer individuals or organizations control increasing shares of the mass media in our country. According to independent assessment, about 98% of the media sector is held by three conglomerates. This tendency is not only totally unacceptable, but also to a degree frightening). Learn more hereWe endeavour to provide the community with real-time access to true unfiltered news firsthand from primary sources. It is a bumpy road with all sorties of difficulties. We can only achieve this goal together. Our website is open to any citizen journalists and organizations who want to contribute, publish high-quality insights or send media releases to improve public access to impartial information. You and we have the right to know, learn, read, hear what and how we deem appropriate.Your support is greatly appreciated. All donations are kept completely private and confidential.Thank you in advance!Tags:asset management, Canada, drinking water, Economic Development, federal government, gender equality, Government, infrastructure, Investment, parliament, President, resilience, resources, sustainable, technology, womenlast_img read more

College of Music students to perform at Carnegie Hall

first_img Learn about the campaign for the College of Music Share Share via TwitterShare via FacebookShare via LinkedInShare via E-mail They practiced, practiced, practiced. They got the nod from their faculty and peers.And then they practiced some more.For 14 College of Music graduate and undergraduate students and one recent grad—that’s how you get to Carnegie Hall.On Monday evening, Nov. 7, music at CU Boulder will be well represented on the East Coast when the College of Music puts on a showcase concert at Carnegie Hall’s Weill Recital Hall. Alumni, family, faculty and friends will converge on Midtown Manhattan for an unforgettable evening of inspiring new works and virtuosic classics.“By presenting our top students at Carnegie Hall, we’re letting the world know—first and foremost—that they are ready for this,” says College of Music Dean Robert Shay.On the heels of April’s Boettcher Hall concert in Denver, the Weill Hall performance represents one of the key elements of the College of Music Advantage: providing professional-level experiences for students.“Opportunities like this Carnegie performance exemplify the edge we want to give to all our students,” Shay says. “We expect to present many more concerts like this in the future, in New York and elsewhere, but it’s highly fitting we start at Carnegie, given what a debut there has meant through the years to so many of the world’s greatest musicians.”For the student musicians, the reality of playing in front of a New York crowd in one of the most enduring venues in the world is just starting to sink in.The Altius QuartetAndrew Giordano, violin; Joshua Ulrich, violin; Andrew Krimm, viola; Zachary Reaves, cello“A performance like this is one that gives you a real sense of legitimacy forever,” says Altius Quartet cellist Zachary Reaves.Reaves and the other members of the Fischoff Competition silver medalist Altius headline the program. It won’t be their first time at Carnegie: they sat in the audience as their mentors, the world-renowned Takács Quartet, perform there.“It was before we came to CU to study with them,” says Reaves. “It was inspiring to see them in that setting.”Still, it’ll be their first time taking that intimate stage, and the graduate quartet-in-residence will take this opportunity to make a splash in New York.“It’s one of the most famous concert halls for a reason. Adding your name to the list of artists who have performed there adds a unique sense of pressure. We’re going to raise our game.”At Weill Hall, the Altius performs movements from Mendelssohn’s A-minor string quartet and Shostakovich’s String Quartet No. 9 in E-flat Major.They’ll also bring a relatively new piece to the stage—written by a CU Boulder alumnus.JP Merz, composerComposer JP Merz describes his “through fog” as an energetic and hopeful piece—perfect for introducing New York to the pioneering Colorado state of mind.“The title came to me last January, as I drove back to Boulder after winter break in dense fog,” Merz explains. “The long drive took on a tone of perseverance through tough and hazy times. And triumph over the same hazy, unclear texture comes out in the piece.”Merz currently lives in Minneapolis, where he’s working with the Saint Paul Chamber Orchestra’s Liquid Music Series and securing commissions. The Altius premiered “Through Fog” last spring on the Pendulum New Music series at CU Boulder.“It shows off the capabilities of the instruments and includes some unusual combinations,” Merz adds.Having just graduated in May, Merz says hearing one of his pieces performed in Carnegie Hall will be encouraging as he embarks on his career. “As a student, you’re always searching for validation for your work. This feels like a really validating moment for me.”Michael Hoffman, tenor; Benjamin Anderson, horn; Emily Alley, pianoTenor Michael Hoffman brings Schubert’s “Auf dem Strom” to the hall—a piece he says is perfect for the relative close quarters of Weill.“In a large space, you wouldn’t have the intimacy that this piece calls for,” Hoffman explains. “It’s meant to be performed in a much smaller setting, where you can get close to the audience.”Hoffman will be joined on stage by Benjamin Anderson, horn, and Emily Alley, piano. He says the story of loss and loneliness—written by Schubert as a farewell to Beethoven—is told beautifully by the melancholy voice of the horn.”A common theme in lieder is unrequited love. Schubert uses the subtle undertones of this as an ode to Beethoven’s influence on his musical development,” Hoffman explains. “The horn is the voice of heroic death and memories of the narrator’s love, the piano paints the landscape of the varying intensities of the river and I depict the narrator’s journey down the river.”Hoffman has his eyes on a chamber music performance career, and he says performing on the Weill Hall stage represents a milestone in his musical life.”Music is the one thing that’s always brought the different people in my life together, from small-town Minnesota hunters and fishermen to the people I’ve met all around the world. I know I am in the right profession when my greatest passions can bring together those I love the most.”Kellan Toohey, clarinet; Cecilia Lo-Chien Kao, pianoIn contrast to the lyrical Schubert, clarinetist Kellan Toohey is set to thrill audiences with German composer Jörg Widmann’s “Fantasie.”“It’s extremely virtuosic, kind of crazy, fun to play and exciting to listen to,” Boulder native Toohey says.A clarinetist himself, Widmann wrote “Fantasie” early in his career; it’s considered one of the most challenging and innovative works in the clarinet repertoire. Toohey couples the piece with two movements from Carl Maria von Weber’s “Grand Duo Concertant,” which he performs with pianist Cecilia Lo-Chien Kao. Widmann took cues from Weber when composing “Fantasie,” making them the perfect pairing of romantic and modern clarinet themes.“I think it’s a great variety of music and shows off a lot of different colors and contrasts,” Toohey says about the pieces. “I’ve wanted to play in Carnegie Hall since I was a kid, and I hope people leave the concert inspired.“We can’t thank the College of Music enough for organizing this opportunity for us.”CU Boulder Horn QuartetJason Friedman, Jordan Miller, Maggie Rickard, Cort RobertsCU Boulder’s horn quartet performs a newer work as well: Western composer Kerry Turner wrote “Fanfare for Barcs” in 1989 to commemorate the success of the American Horn Quartet at a competition in Barcs, Hungary.The fanfare opens the concert, in a way commemorating Colorado’s introduction to the East Coast’s most legendary venue.“It’s celebratory and exciting and a little bit loud,” says Jordan Miller, a member of the horn quartet. “And the horn is the perfect voice to kick off the concert.”Miller says that in order to get the most mileage out of “Barcs” and to fully prepare for Weill Hall, Associate Professor of Horn Michael Thornton set up a coaching session for the group with a member of a different quartet—Takács Quartet violinist Edward Dusinberre.“It was incredible to get a chance to work with him,” Miller says. “He’s one of the best chamber musicians in the world and we’re lucky to have had that opportunity.”Every member of the horn quartet hails from Colorado.Grace Burns, pianoRounding out the program, pianist Grace Burns gives life to one of Liszt’s most artistically interesting and beloved etudes, the Transcendental Étude No. 11 in D-flat. Full of chromatic harmonies, broken chords and full octave jumps, it’s also challenging.“Liszt’s works are almost always characterized as virtuoso,” Burns says, “but this piece also shows off the side of him that’s so beautiful, and I wanted to do something more personal for this setting.”Burns isn’t the only member of her family putting on the show of a lifetime in New York this November: Just the day before she takes the stage at Weill, she’ll be on the sidelines at the New York Marathon.“My father in law is running the marathon, so I have several family members in town already. It was a happy coincidence,” she says.With their repertoire set and rehearsals taking place as often as possible, the performers say their goal as they prepare for Carnegie is to represent the diverse talent of the College of Music and leave the audience on Nov. 7 with a sense of just how special the music scene is in Boulder.“We want them to feel that they went on a musical journey with us through all the different ensembles,” says Hoffman. “If they’re thinking, ‘Boy, that school really has some incredible musicians and we should seek them out,’ that would be the ultimate goal.”The University of Colorado Boulder College of Music Showcase is Monday, Nov. 7 at 8 p.m. in Weill Recital Hall. Tickets are $40.Tags:AlumniBrass and PercussionCompositionEventsKeyboardStringsStudentsVideoWoodwinds music+ Published: Oct. 5, 2016 • By Jessie Bauters last_img read more

A Woman with a Big Service Heart; PM Saddened at Ruby Martin’s Passing

first_imgA Woman with a Big Service Heart; PM Saddened at Ruby Martin’s Passing InformationApril 10, 2012 RelatedA Woman with a Big Service Heart; PM Saddened at Ruby Martin’s Passing FacebookTwitterWhatsAppEmail Prime Minister, the Most Hon Portia Simpson Miller, has expressed sadness at the passing of philanthropist and social change advocate Mrs Ruby Martin, CD. ‘A determined spirit has been silenced”, said the Prime Minister, noting that Mrs Martin was “a woman with a big service heart who had dedicated the majority of her engaging national life to bringing about meaningful change in the care facilities of the children at the Maxfield Park Children’s Home, the preservation of our national treasure, the Ward Theatre, and other causes.” “Passionate and dedicated to service, Mrs Martin was fully consumed with helping others, and her passing brings to an end decades of focused and inspiring leadership of these and the many other social and charitable causes to which she devoted her life. She will be missed,” the Prime Minister said. Recipient of the Order of Distinction – Commander Class in 2010, and a Justice of the Peace, Mrs Martin, 75, died late Saturday night after battling cancer for several years. The Prime Minister has expressed condolences on behalf of the government to her children – Abid and Safia, and other family members. Advertisementscenter_img RelatedA Woman with a Big Service Heart; PM Saddened at Ruby Martin’s Passing RelatedArchives Critical to Jamaica’s Historylast_img read more

Great California ShakeOut prompts earthquake safety discussion

first_imgHomeEarthGreat California ShakeOut prompts earthquake safety discussion Oct. 14, 2019 at 1:00 pmEarthEducationEnvironmentFeaturedNewsGreat California ShakeOut prompts earthquake safety discussionBrennon Dixson2 years agoearthquakeShake OutSMPrepared On the 30th anniversary of the destructive Loma Prieta Earthquake, which rocked the Bay Area in 1989, the state of California will hold its annual Great California ShakeOut in an effort to prepare Californians for future natural disasters.On Thursday, Oct. 17, at 10:17 a.m., participating cities, organizations and citizens across the state will participate in the 12th annual drill that aims to help residents practice their “Drop, Cover, and Hold On” skills.A natural catastrophe could strike at any time with very little warning, according to the city’s Chief Resilience Officer Lindsay Call, who spoke on earthquake safety at a recent community event hosted at the Santa Monica Public Library.Alongside Margaret Vinci from the Caltech Office of Earthquake Programs, Call discussed modern earthquake science, early warning technologies like ShakeAlert and the different programs in the city that help people prepare themselves for the next natural disaster.“We did a show and tell of different disaster kit items that people should have and we discussed CERT — our Community Emergency Response Team,” Call said, describing the program as a community-based group of volunteers who completed a training course taught by local public safety personnel and first responders. The training is a comprehensive program detailing the best ways to assist family, friends, neighbors and other members of your community during small or large scale disasters, according to the CERT website, and the next class is scheduled to be held on Jan. 25, Feb. 1, and Feb. 8. “So people are encouraged to register for that,” Call said, or they can join a group called, “S.M.O.A.I.D., which stands for Santa Monica Organizations Active in Disasters (and) is a coalition of businesses, nonprofits and community organizations working together before disaster events to create ways for the community to be prepared.” There’s also an organized group who helps during the response as well.“The reason we hosted the presentation at the main library was we just installed an early earthquake warning system,” Call said, so if it’s suspected that the vibrations from an earthquake will be large enough cause damage in Santa Monica, then an overhead page will go off in the library alerting patrons to stop, cover and hold on.There may be an opportunity test it out during the coming Great California Shakeout — an event Call strongly encouraged the community to participate in.“No matter if you’re in a household, a business or school, we encourage everyone to take an opportunity this Thursday at 10:17 (a.m.) to stop, take a look around and identify where you would be most safe after an earthquake. Most of the time that means dropping, covering and holding on to a sturdy table or desk,” Call said, adding, “We expect in the big one that shaking could last for 2 minutes so it’s important to consider the need to protect oneself from falling glass,” as well as the possible aftershocks, fires, transportation and utility disruptions that could arise should a strong quake strike the area.Many more resources and information about the Great California ShakeOut can be found online at shakeout.org/california, according to Call. The city is also encouraging the public to post pictures of the coming drill and use the hashtag “SMPrepared.”Tags :earthquakeShake OutSMPreparedshare on Facebookshare on Twitteradd a commentEarth Talk – Flying ShameCity Council to hear recommendations to prevent child abuse in youth programs as part of Uller investigationYou Might Also LikeFeaturedNewsBobadilla rejects Santa Monica City Manager positionMatthew Hall7 hours agoNewsCouncil picks new City ManagerBrennon Dixson18 hours agoFeaturedNewsProtesting parents and Snapchat remain in disagreement over child protection policiesClara Harter18 hours agoFeaturedNewsDowntown grocery to become mixed use developmenteditor18 hours agoNewsBruised but unbowed, meme stock investors are back for moreAssociated Press18 hours agoNewsWedding boom is on in the US as vendors scramble to keep upAssociated Press18 hours agolast_img read more