Martin Audio Ships WPS

first_imgMartin Audio is already shipping its WPS, the fourth model in the Wavefront Precision optimized line array series. The Wavefront Precision architecture delivers improved coverage, consistency and control compared with standard line arrays, making the product series uniquely flexible, upgradeable and financially accessible.The latest addition to the Wavefront Precision range can achieve a peak SPL of 133 decibels and is perfect for applications that require a high output array with reduced weight and footprint. This makes it ideal for live sound reinforcement and installations in theaters, concert halls and houses of worship, while rental companies will see scope in deploying WPS arrays as front-fill, delay or side-hang support for larger Wavefront Precision systems.The passive three-way system integrates a high density of drive units in a very compact enclosure, specifically 2×8″ LF drivers, 4×4″ midrange drivers and 4×1″ exit HF compression drivers loaded by a molded HF horn which occupies the full width of the enclosure — defining the 100° horizontal constant directivity coverage pattern of both the HF and midrange sections.For extended low frequency performance, WPS is designed to be partnered with the SXC118 cardioid subwoofer and its flyable variant, SXCF118.WPS is here.A video we shot from ISE 2019 on WaveFront is here:last_img read more

Unexpected consequences of early retirement

first_img ShareShareSharePrintMailGooglePinterestDiggRedditStumbleuponDeliciousBufferTumblr Early retirement can have a surprising impact on your social life and emotions.by. David NingPretty much everyone, at one point or another, has wished for an early retirement. The freedom and flexibility of not worrying about how to make a living is certainly very appealing. But once you start down the road of saving for early retirement you may find these surprises waiting for you.Your career can still feel very long. Even if you plan to retire at 45, which is considered an incredibly young age to stop working, you are still going to be working for two decades. And early retirees need to keep their living expenses lower and save significantly more of their paychecks than people planning to retire at a more traditional retirement age if they want to leave the workforce for good. It can be difficult to maintain the focus and commitment required to save enough to retire at a young age.Working so hard could make you want to retire even sooner. The more you think about a life in which you don’t have to go to work, the more you will want to move up that date. Instead of retirement at 45, you may want to quit your job at 42, or even 40. But each time you move up your retirement age, you will have to work even harder to earn and save more. Don’t work so hard that you become burnt out and unable to meet your goal.You might be afraid to quit. Even if you have saved enough money, you might find yourself apprehensive about leaving your job. Doubts will creep in about being able to afford your expenses for the rest of your life, and you may find yourself wanting to work longer to beef up your finances so that you can better weather the possibility of running out of money. There’s no way to know what inflation will be over the next five decades or if there will be another significant financial downturn. Staying in the workforce a few more years can seem safer than beginning to spend down the savings you worked so hard to acquire. continue reading »last_img read more

FBI: Purveyors Of Fraudulent Native American-style Goods And Products Sentenced In Federal Court In Albuquerque

first_imgFBI News:ALBUQUERQUE – Jawad Khalaf, 72, of Albuquerque, Nashat Khalaf, 73, of Gallup; Sterling Islands, Inc.; a wholesale jewelry business in Albuquerque and Al-Zuni Global Jewelry, Inc., a wholesale jewelry business in Gallup, were sentenced Thursday in Federal Court in Albuquerque,In April, the defendants pled guilty to misrepresentation of Indian-produced goods and services in an amount greater than $1,000 as part of a scheme to import Native American-style jewelry from the Philippines and sell it to customers in the United States as authentic.  Another defendant, Taha Shawar, 49, of Breckenridge, Colo., remains a fugitive.Jawad Khalaf and Nash Khalaf were sentenced to 2 years’ supervised release and Jawad Khalaf must also perform 100 hours of community service. Sterling Islands Inc. was sentenced to 5 years’ probation and 50 hours community service, while Al-Zuni Global Jewelers, Inc. was sentenced to 5 years’ probation and 20 hours community service. Collectively, the defendants will pay $300,000 to the Indian Arts and Crafts Board and forfeit their interests in $288,738.94 seized by investigators in the case.A grand jury returned an indictment on Dec. 19, 2018, charging these defendants and three other people with conspiracy, smuggling goods into the United States and misrepresentation of Indian-produced goods and products. The defendants admitted that on Oct. 28, 2015, they displayed and offered for sale miniature canteens at Al-Zuni Global Jewelry in Gallup.  These canteens were not actually Indian-produced but could have reasonably been mistaken for authentic Indian-produced canteens.“I want to express my appreciation for the hard work of the investigators and prosecutors who brought this case to conclusion,’ said John C. Anderson, U.S. Attorney for the District of New Mexico. “It is the culmination of countless hours of diligent work and cooperation among our partnering law enforcement agencies on behalf of Native American artists and artisans. We stand ready to bring the power of the law to bear upon those seeking to profit from cultural theft.”“This U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service-led investigation uncovered a transnational criminal scheme that defrauded U.S. consumers and Native American artists,” said Assistant Director of the Office of Law Enforcement Edward Grace. “I would like to thank our special agents for their exemplar investigative work as well as our state and federal partners, who because of their collaboration and dedication to duty, these defendants were sentenced yesterday.”“The Land of Enchantment’s identity and economy relies heavily on Indian art and culture,” said Meridith Stanton, director of the Indian Arts and Crafts Board (IACB), U.S. Department of the Interior. The IACB by statute is responsible for enforcement of the Indian Arts and Crafts Act, which includes criminal penalties for marketing counterfeit Indian art and craftwork, to protect the economic livelihoods of Indian artists and artisans.“Consumers must have confidence that the ‘Indian art’ they are purchasing in New Mexico is authentic, and not imported from factories in the Philippines,” Director Stanton said.  “At the same time, Indian artists and economies must be protected from unfair competition from counterfeit Indian art. Robust Indian Arts and Crafts Act enforcement ensures that Indian artistic traditions can be passed down from one generation to the next to preserve an important American treasure – authentic Indian art. The Board commends our colleagues at the Office of the U.S. Attorney for the District of New Mexico and the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service’s Office of Law Enforcement for their extraordinary dedication, diligence, and commitment in working with us to combat the sale of counterfeit Indian art.”“The FBI hopes this case sends a loud and clear message that those who try to cheat Native Americans of their cultural heritage will be held accountable,” said James C. Langenberg, Special Agent in Charge of the FBI’s Albuquerque Field Office. “We will continue working closely with our partners to make sure our nation’s precious artistic resources are protected.”“These individuals conspired to exploit the rich culture and work of Indian artisans for their personal gain by selling counterfeit merchandise and passing it as genuine Indian art and craftwork,” said Erik P. Breitzke, acting Special Agent in Charge of Homeland Security Investigations (HIS) El Paso. “This sentence sends a powerful message to others who believe they can do the same and elude justice. HSI will continue to cooperate with our law enforcement partners to assist in protecting and preserving Native American cultural heritage.” “Yesterday’s sentencing marks a turning point in this case and provides some closure to those who were victimized by this unfair practice,” said Sonya K. Chavez, U.S. Marshal for the District of New Mexico. “This collaboration affirms law enforcement’s commitment to pursuing those who believe they can get away with fraud against our state and our unique cultural resources.”“The Department of Game and Fish is proud to have been an integral part of this multi-jurisdictional prosecution,” said New Mexico Department of Game and Fish Director Michael Sloane. “We take pride in both conserving wildlife and protecting the diverse cultures of New Mexico. We congratulate our partners on a job well done.”The Office of Law Enforcement for the Southwest Region of the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service led the investigation of this case with assistance from the Albuquerque Division of the FBI, Homeland Security Investigations, the Indian Arts and Crafts Board, the Drug Enforcement Administration, the U.S. Marshals Service, and the New Mexico Department of Game and Fish.  Assistant U.S. Attorneys Jonathon M. Gerson, Sean J. Sullivan, Kristopher N. Houghton, and Stephen R. Kotz prosecuted the case.last_img read more

Westhampton Beach Commencement

first_img Share Westhampton Beach High School had its 111th commencement on Friday, June 28, at 6 PM and celebrated the graduating class of 2019.The commencement started with a welcome speech from the principal, Dr. Christopher Herr, and continued on to the Pledge of Allegiance and the national anthem sung by the Chamber Singers.The anthem was followed by speeches from class historian Anna Sophia Perino, salutatorian Frank Murphy Lapinski, and valedictorian Christopher Nathan Bender.The graduation ended with the students receiving their diplomas and flipping their tassels. Congratulations to the new graduates.last_img read more

Court’s Verdict: Stuffed Dog An Illegal Sign

first_imgThere was a split decision in the case of the East Hampton Village store owner who had a stuffed dog with a welcome sign around its neck outside her shop on Park Place. In a verdict written on February 28 and shared via fax on Monday, East Hampton Town Justice Lisa Rana found the owner of Petit Blue, Colleen Moeller, not guilty of illegally displaying merchandise outside the entrance to her store on Park Place, but guilty of violating East Hampton Village zoning code regarding signage.A code enforcement officer for the village, Robert Jahoda, wrote the charges up against Moeller on November 8. Moeller’s attorney, Daniel Rodgers, did not dispute certain facts in the case, including that Moeller had placed two large plush stuffed dogs outside her toy store, along with a chalkboard for children to write on. On one of the stuffed animals, a Golden Retriever that Moeller said during her testimony was named “Happy” by her daughter, had a wooden welcome sign around his neck.Rodgers did dispute, and Moeller affirmed in her testimony during the trial, which lasted a bit over an hour, that neither of the stuffed dogs outside the shop were for sale. Rana agreed.Moeller also told the court that she had placed the dogs outside the shop because, during the offseason, so many stores in the village are closed that she wanted to show hers was open.Rana found the placement of the dogs on the stairwell to the shop with the sign hanging on one “was to attract the attention of the public,” and therefore was not allowed under the village code, which, she wrote, prohibits such signage or advertising structure.Rodgers said in an email that the sign section of the code was crafted over a century ago.“Over a century later, particularly with competition from online retailers, this law related to brick-and-mortar business ‘attracting the attention of the public’ seems entirely inappropriate, meaningless, and mean-spirited,” he said.Sentencing, which could include a fine of up to $500, and, theoretically, a jail sentence of 15 days, will take place on March 16.t.e@indyeastend.com Sharelast_img read more

“Important” compressor order for Galileo

first_imgGet instant access to must-read content today!To access hundreds of features, subscribe today! At a time when the world is forced to go digital more than ever before just to stay connected, discover the in-depth content our subscribers receive every month by subscribing to gasworld.Don’t just stay connected, stay at the forefront – join gasworld and become a subscriber to access all of our must-read content online from just $270. Subscribelast_img

Orange County expands California’s zero-emission footprint

first_imgGet instant access to must-read content today!To access hundreds of features, subscribe today! At a time when the world is forced to go digital more than ever before just to stay connected, discover the in-depth content our subscribers receive every month by subscribing to gasworld.Don’t just stay connected, stay at the forefront – join gasworld and become a subscriber to access all of our must-read content online from just $270. Subscribelast_img

Enterprise Managed Services Limited v East Midland Contracting Limited

first_imgStay at the forefront of thought leadership with news and analysis from award-winning journalists. Enjoy company features, CEO interviews, architectural reviews, technical project know-how and the latest innovations.Limited access to building.co.ukBreaking industry news as it happensBreaking, daily and weekly e-newsletters To continue enjoying Building.co.uk, sign up for free guest accessExisting subscriber? LOGIN Subscribe now for unlimited access Get your free guest access  SIGN UP TODAY Subscribe to Building today and you will benefit from:Unlimited access to all stories including expert analysis and comment from industry leadersOur league tables, cost models and economics dataOur online archive of over 10,000 articlesBuilding magazine digital editionsBuilding magazine print editionsPrinted/digital supplementsSubscribe now for unlimited access.View our subscription options and join our communitylast_img read more

How can we make the most of the public estate?

first_imgSubscribe to Building today and you will benefit from:Unlimited access to all stories including expert analysis and comment from industry leadersOur league tables, cost models and economics dataOur online archive of over 10,000 articlesBuilding magazine digital editionsBuilding magazine print editionsPrinted/digital supplementsSubscribe now for unlimited access.View our subscription options and join our community To continue enjoying Building.co.uk, sign up for free guest accessExisting subscriber? LOGIN Get your free guest access  SIGN UP TODAY Subscribe now for unlimited access Stay at the forefront of thought leadership with news and analysis from award-winning journalists. Enjoy company features, CEO interviews, architectural reviews, technical project know-how and the latest innovations.Limited access to building.co.ukBreaking industry news as it happensBreaking, daily and weekly e-newsletterslast_img read more

Paul Plummer

first_imgPaul Plummer, Group Strategy Director of Network Rail, has been appointed Chief Executive of the UK’s Rail Delivery Group and the Association of Train Operating Companies. Plummer will take over from Michael Roberts in November.last_img