Public Notice: Missing And Murdered Indigenous Women Task Force Meets Nov. 8

first_imgNM Indian Affairs Department News:The Missing and Murdered Indigenous Women Task Force is meeting noon to 5 p.m. Friday, Nov. 8 in the Board Room at CNM Main Campus at 525 Buena Vista Dr. SE, in Albuquerque.The meeting is open to the public.Public parking is available south of University Boulevard across CNM Main Campus. An agenda will be available at least 72 hours prior to the meeting and posted on the Indian Affairs Department’s homepage at http://www.iad.state.nm.us/.Direct questions about the MMIW Task Force meeting to Stephanie Salazar at 505.690.4079 or by email at: stephanie.salazar@state.nm.us.last_img read more

Orval Hart Receives Mid-Year Community Asset Award

first_imgOrval Hart, center right, of Los Alamos at a 2009 award ceremony for winning the road race at the World Senior Games in St. George, Utah. Hart also took home first place overall that year. Courtesy photo Capt. Orval Hart in his Civil Air Patrol uniform receives a mid-year Community Asset Award. Courtesy photo By BERNADETTE LAURITZENChampions of Youth AmbitionsLos AlamosI always believe in admitting when you make a mistake. We all make them, so admit it, apologize, and set out to make things right. If it becomes a habit and part of your character, apologizing won’t be an insurmountable obstacle.During 2019, Champions of Youth Ambitions regular Jackie Hurtle nominated someone for a Community Asset Award. The local nonprofit has recognized folks annually since 2009. When the nomination was made, unfortunately I titled the file 2020. The awards are generally held in January of February for the previous year. When the list came out one of her nominees was missing.I began to conspire with local YMCA CEO Rob Wilkinson for a surprise recognition. It would take us a while, but a plan was underway. Then the world changed, and plan B would be to find the nominee, apologize for my error and invite him to the next ceremony. One reason being my error and two because the community needs some good news.I am thrilled to say White Rock resident Orval Hart was not mad at me. I asked him a few questions then planned a doorstep, contactless delivery. One of my favorite things to know is a person’s favorite cookie, so the gift idea was brewing exponentially.During high school, Hart was a day camp counselor for the Pasadena YMCA, and for the Alhambra YMCA. That was back in the day when a leader might take 10-12 kids on sightseeing tours of Los Angeles, constantly counting to see that you still have everyone in tow or camping in the mountains. He graduated high school in 1957, spent three years in the Army, which he believes prepared him for college at California Polytechnic in Pomona. He learned computers on the college’s first computer and made a career out of it. He worked at the Jet Propulsion Lab, with software for deep space unmanned missions, and with Hughes Aircraft, NATO air defense system based in Milan, Italy, before coming to Los Alamos in the fall of 1970.Hart and his wife have four children, 14 grandchildren and three great grandchildren. He was nominated by Jeremy Smith and Jackie Hurtle for his work with various races and pickle ball for the YMCA. He is an avid cyclist still today.“Staying active is a way of life for me, having raced bicycles for 45 years here and in Europe, mainly Italy,” Hart said. “It keeps balance in your life, clearing your mind for the other things in life.”The day of the drive by recognition, Hart was impeccably dressed as it was a Sunday … the Saturday delivery was rained out. Earlier that day, he had cycled to Bandelier and back, a regular activity. According to Hart, the ride has gotten, “dramatically slower,” which he reports could be totally possible at 81. While I didn’t request permission to state his age, I have a feeling he would forgive me in order to inspire his community to get out there, staying safe and balanced, of course.Champions of Youth Ambitions, C’YA celebrates their sixth birthday this week. Check us about at www.cya-nm.org.last_img read more

Barbara Lynn Of Los Alamos Named To Subcommittee For Governor’s Newly Created Council For Racial Justice

first_imgIbukun Adepoju, of Clovis, is a public defender and board member of the New Mexico Criminal Defense Lawyers Association.Benjamin Bencomo, of Las Vegas, is currently a member of the faculty at the New Mexico Highlands University School of Social Work, in addition to serving on the Diversity Committee for the national Council on Social Work Education. Ken Carson, of Albuquerque, is a small business owner with a past career in banking. He previously served as Bank Examiner for the federal government and as Director of the Financial Institutions Division of the New Mexico Regulation and Licensing Department.zadeh Osanloo, of Las Cruces, is a professor of educational leadership and administration at New Mexico State University. He has worked in the areas of social justice, diversity, educational equity and educational leadership for over twenty years.Aaliyah Quintana, of Valdez, is a junior at the University of New Mexico studying political science and pre-law.Christopher Ramirez, of Albuquerque, is co-founder and executive director of Together for Brothers, a community organization led by young men of color that stewards leadership and community change. He is also a co-founder of the UNM Dream Team, New Mexico Dreamers in Action, Men of Color Initiative, and Men of Color Alliance.Education SubcommitteeJoseph Garcia, of Albuquerque, is the president of Leaders Uniting Voices Youth Advocates of New Mexico (LUVYA), a CYFD foster youth-led initiative.Kiran Katira, of Albuquerque, is a scholar of racial ideology in educational thought and socio-cultural studies and a co-founder of the University of New Mexico Community Engagement Center. She is a national trainer with the People’s Institute for Survival and Beyond and an organizer for Families United for Education.Nancy Lopez, of Albuquerque, is a sociologist and co-founder of the Institute for the Study of “Race” and Social Justice. She is a founding coordinator of the New Mexico Statewide Race, Gender, Class Data Policy Consortium.Mark Ramirez, of Albuquerque, is a social worker at the New Mexico School for the Deaf and the director of the Youth Leadership Camp for Deaf youth.Evelyn Rising, of Hobbs, is a board member of the University of the Southwest and a University of New Mexico Health Sciences Community Health HERO. She is the public relations director for the New Mexico NAACP and previously served as the president of the national Association of Colored Women’s Clubs, Inc.Elisa Sanchez, of Las Cruces, is the creator and former director of the Southern New Mexico ENLACE Collaborative at New Mexico State University and the former president of MANA.Alvino Sandoval, Navajo, is an advocate for students with disabilities and the founder of the Tribal and Indigenous Early Childhood Network. STATE News:SANTA FE — Gov. Michelle Lujan Grisham has announced the membership of the Governor’s Council for Racial Justice, an advisory group tasked with counseling the administration and monitoring state institutions, holding them accountable for taking action to end systemic racism and ensure that all persons receive fair and equal treatment and opportunities.Barbara Lynn, of Los Alamos has been appointed to the Public Safety and Law Enforcement Subcommittee of the new Council for Racial Justice. She is the lead human resources generalist for Los Alamos National Laboratory and former director of the Office of Equal Opportunity Services at LANL.The governor announced her intent to create this new council in the wake of peaceful protests around the globe following the death of George Floyd in Minneapolis. Floyd, a Black man, died while a white police officer pinned him to the ground with a knee to his neck while investigating a non-violent crime. Applications for the council were open to the general public.“As I said at the outset of this overdue global movement for racial justice, we must not let the passion of this moment fade,” Gov. Lujan Grisham said. “In New Mexico, our multicultural heritage is both an opportunity to move forward and a mandate to reflect on where we’ve come from as a means of shaping an equitable future for all. My commitment is that my administration will listen first. I am grateful to the New Mexicans who have volunteered their time and energy to this work. We have the opportunity to lead as a state. I am confident we will seize the moment.”The selected members represent a diverse group of New Mexicans from across the state, ranging in age, race and ethnicity, with a wide variety of expertise and focuses. The council’s first gathering is not yet scheduled but will meet virtually in the coming weeks.Central Committee:Stephen Archuleta, of Taos, is a community activist and former New Mexico Children, Youth and Families Department director for juvenile justice. He also previously served as Taos County Manager.Charles Becknell, Jr., of Rio Rancho, is the Dean of the African Studies Department at the University of New Mexico and serves as the minister at the Emmanuel Baptist Church in Rio Rancho.Dawn G. Begay, Navajo, is the Native American Affairs Coordinator for the City of Albuquerque Office of Equity and Inclusion and previously worked in homeless outreach at First Nations Community HealthSource.Johana Bencomo, of Las Cruces, is the executive director of New Mexico Comunidades en Acción y de Fé (NM CAFé) and a Las Cruces City Councilor.Bishop David Cooper, of Albuquerque, is the senior pastor at New Hope Full Gospel Baptist Church and recently served as the president of the Ministerial Alliance of Albuquerque and Vicinity.Joseph Cotton, of Hobbs, is the current president of the New Mexico NAACP. He also serves on the New Mexico Office of African American Affairs Advisory Board.Reverend Donna Marie Davis, of Albuquerque, is the pastor at Grant Chapel African Methodist Epicopal Church in Albuquerque. She has been ordained by the AME Church for over 25 years and has led Black churches across the country.Rabbi Robert Lennick, of Santa Fe, is the executive director of the Jewish Federation of New Mexico and previously served as the President of the national interfaith organization Religion in American Life.Jennifer Lim, of Albuquerque, is the co-leader of the National Asian Pacific American Women’s Forum, in addition to serving on the board of the Asian American Association of New Mexico and on the Diversity Council of the University of New Mexico Diversity, Equity and Inclusion Department.Senator Linda Lopez, of Albuquerque, is the New Mexico Senate council appointee. She is a small business owner and currently serves as the Chairwoman of the Senate Rules Committee.Sebastian Margaret, of Santa Fe, is a Soros Justice Fellow launching the Disability Project at the Transgender Law Center.Darshan Patel, of Albuquerque, is a physician of family and community medicine at University of New Mexico Hospital and an organizer for White Coats for Black and Indigenous Lives.Alexis Maria Rael, of Santa Fe, is a 2016 graduate of Santa Fe High school currently pursuing a Masters in Business Administration at the University of New Mexico. She is currently an intern at Sandia National Laboratories.Jaclyn Roessel, Navajo, currently works with the New Mexico Indian Affairs Department to deliver cultural equity training for the fulfillment of the State Tribal Collaboration Act.Arsenio Romero, of Deming, is the Superintendent of Deming Public Schools and serves on the Board of Regents at New Mexico State University.Allen Sanchez, of Los Lunas, is the president of CHI St. Joseph’s Children and the executive director of the New Mexico Conference of Catholic Bishops.Corrine Sanchez, San Ildefonso Pueblo, is the executive director of Tewa Women United and a member of the first national cohort of Move to End Violence.Terrance Smith, of Albuquerque, is a community organizer working in youth athletics. He is pursuing a doctorate degree in organizational leadership.Micele Ali Surodjawan, of Albuquerque, is a senior at La Cueva High School, where he is Co-President of the Unified Sports Club, a DECA 2020 national qualifier, and a varsity basketball player.Alexandria Taylor, of Albuquerque, is the deputy director of the New Mexico Coalition of Sexual Assault Programs and serves on the board of the ACLU of New Mexico.Austin Weahkee, Cochiti, Zuni and Navajo, is a grassroots Native organizer who works for the Native American Voters Alliance. He previously worked to create the Albuquerque Commission on Indian Affairs.Representative Sheryl Williams Stapleton, of Albuquerque, is the New Mexico House council appointee. She is the first African American woman to be elected to the New Mexico Legislature, where she currently serves as the Majority Leader of the House, and is an educator with Albuquerque Public Schools.Janene Yazzie, Navajo, is the New Mexico Indian Affairs council appointee. She is a community organizer and human rights advocate currently serving as a consultant for both the International Indigenous Treaty Council and the National Native American Boarding School Healing Coalition.Kimberly York, of Las Cruces, is the New Mexico Office of African American Affairs council appointee. She previously worked as a clinical social worker for the Las Cruces Public Schools. She is currently pursuing a doctoral degree in organizational and industrial psychology and serves on the New Mexico Office of African American Affairs executive advisory board.Health Subcommittee:Hope Alvarado, of Albuquerque, is a youth leader with the New Mexico Child Advocacy Network (NMCAN), partnering with young people to build community, promote equity and lead change.Husayn Bin-Bilal, of Belen, is a hospitalist in the Department of Internal Medicine at the University of New Mexico Hospital and serves as the Assistant Director of Simulation and Communication for the Department of Hospital Medicine.Margaret E. Montoya, of Albuquerque, previously served as the senior adviser to the University of New Mexico Health Science Center Chancellor and was a member of the UNM Law School faculty for twenty years.Brian Serna, of Santa Fe, is the founder and CEO of Serna Solutions, specializing in behavioral health counseling. He is also the director of the Addictions, Abuse and Recovery Certificate at Southwestern College.Anjali Taneja, of Albuquerque, is a physician and the executive director of Casa de Salud in Albuquerque’s South Valley, where she leads an anti-racist health care workforce development pipeline program. She also is a Robert Wood Johnson Foundation Clinical Scholar.Public Safety and Law Enforcement SubcommitteeBarbara Lynn, of Los Alamos, is the lead human resources generalist for Los Alamos National Laboratory and the former director of the Office of Equal Opportunity Services at LANL.last_img read more

Bluebirds Lifting Spirits Around Los Alamos

first_imgBluebirds visit a backyard garden with a pond Thursday lifting spirits on Barranca Mesa and around Los Alamos. These birds are highly social, usually feeding in flocks during the non-breeding season. They hunt for terrestrial insects by dropping to the ground from a low perch. Bluebirds also frequently feed on berries in trees and rely on trees both for nesting cavities and hunting perches. Source: allaboutbirds.com. Photo by Selvi Viswanathan Bluebirds visit a backyard garden with a nearby pond Thursday on Barranca Mesa. Photo by Selvi Viswanathan Bluebirds visit a backyard garden with a nearby pond Thursday on Barranca Mesa. Photo by Selvi Viswanathancenter_img Bluebirds visit a backyard garden with a nearby pond Thursday on Barranca Mesa. Photo by Selvi Viswanathanlast_img read more

FBI: Purveyors Of Fraudulent Native American-style Goods And Products Sentenced In Federal Court In Albuquerque

first_imgFBI News:ALBUQUERQUE – Jawad Khalaf, 72, of Albuquerque, Nashat Khalaf, 73, of Gallup; Sterling Islands, Inc.; a wholesale jewelry business in Albuquerque and Al-Zuni Global Jewelry, Inc., a wholesale jewelry business in Gallup, were sentenced Thursday in Federal Court in Albuquerque,In April, the defendants pled guilty to misrepresentation of Indian-produced goods and services in an amount greater than $1,000 as part of a scheme to import Native American-style jewelry from the Philippines and sell it to customers in the United States as authentic.  Another defendant, Taha Shawar, 49, of Breckenridge, Colo., remains a fugitive.Jawad Khalaf and Nash Khalaf were sentenced to 2 years’ supervised release and Jawad Khalaf must also perform 100 hours of community service. Sterling Islands Inc. was sentenced to 5 years’ probation and 50 hours community service, while Al-Zuni Global Jewelers, Inc. was sentenced to 5 years’ probation and 20 hours community service. Collectively, the defendants will pay $300,000 to the Indian Arts and Crafts Board and forfeit their interests in $288,738.94 seized by investigators in the case.A grand jury returned an indictment on Dec. 19, 2018, charging these defendants and three other people with conspiracy, smuggling goods into the United States and misrepresentation of Indian-produced goods and products. The defendants admitted that on Oct. 28, 2015, they displayed and offered for sale miniature canteens at Al-Zuni Global Jewelry in Gallup.  These canteens were not actually Indian-produced but could have reasonably been mistaken for authentic Indian-produced canteens.“I want to express my appreciation for the hard work of the investigators and prosecutors who brought this case to conclusion,’ said John C. Anderson, U.S. Attorney for the District of New Mexico. “It is the culmination of countless hours of diligent work and cooperation among our partnering law enforcement agencies on behalf of Native American artists and artisans. We stand ready to bring the power of the law to bear upon those seeking to profit from cultural theft.”“This U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service-led investigation uncovered a transnational criminal scheme that defrauded U.S. consumers and Native American artists,” said Assistant Director of the Office of Law Enforcement Edward Grace. “I would like to thank our special agents for their exemplar investigative work as well as our state and federal partners, who because of their collaboration and dedication to duty, these defendants were sentenced yesterday.”“The Land of Enchantment’s identity and economy relies heavily on Indian art and culture,” said Meridith Stanton, director of the Indian Arts and Crafts Board (IACB), U.S. Department of the Interior. The IACB by statute is responsible for enforcement of the Indian Arts and Crafts Act, which includes criminal penalties for marketing counterfeit Indian art and craftwork, to protect the economic livelihoods of Indian artists and artisans.“Consumers must have confidence that the ‘Indian art’ they are purchasing in New Mexico is authentic, and not imported from factories in the Philippines,” Director Stanton said.  “At the same time, Indian artists and economies must be protected from unfair competition from counterfeit Indian art. Robust Indian Arts and Crafts Act enforcement ensures that Indian artistic traditions can be passed down from one generation to the next to preserve an important American treasure – authentic Indian art. The Board commends our colleagues at the Office of the U.S. Attorney for the District of New Mexico and the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service’s Office of Law Enforcement for their extraordinary dedication, diligence, and commitment in working with us to combat the sale of counterfeit Indian art.”“The FBI hopes this case sends a loud and clear message that those who try to cheat Native Americans of their cultural heritage will be held accountable,” said James C. Langenberg, Special Agent in Charge of the FBI’s Albuquerque Field Office. “We will continue working closely with our partners to make sure our nation’s precious artistic resources are protected.”“These individuals conspired to exploit the rich culture and work of Indian artisans for their personal gain by selling counterfeit merchandise and passing it as genuine Indian art and craftwork,” said Erik P. Breitzke, acting Special Agent in Charge of Homeland Security Investigations (HIS) El Paso. “This sentence sends a powerful message to others who believe they can do the same and elude justice. HSI will continue to cooperate with our law enforcement partners to assist in protecting and preserving Native American cultural heritage.” “Yesterday’s sentencing marks a turning point in this case and provides some closure to those who were victimized by this unfair practice,” said Sonya K. Chavez, U.S. Marshal for the District of New Mexico. “This collaboration affirms law enforcement’s commitment to pursuing those who believe they can get away with fraud against our state and our unique cultural resources.”“The Department of Game and Fish is proud to have been an integral part of this multi-jurisdictional prosecution,” said New Mexico Department of Game and Fish Director Michael Sloane. “We take pride in both conserving wildlife and protecting the diverse cultures of New Mexico. We congratulate our partners on a job well done.”The Office of Law Enforcement for the Southwest Region of the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service led the investigation of this case with assistance from the Albuquerque Division of the FBI, Homeland Security Investigations, the Indian Arts and Crafts Board, the Drug Enforcement Administration, the U.S. Marshals Service, and the New Mexico Department of Game and Fish.  Assistant U.S. Attorneys Jonathon M. Gerson, Sean J. Sullivan, Kristopher N. Houghton, and Stephen R. Kotz prosecuted the case.last_img read more

Don’t forget me, Notts

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Ark to go on the market after Vivendi-Seagram merger

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Labour revolt over empty rates

first_imgBrown slammed the tax as ‘destructive’ and hinted that exemption in some areas may be granted. A week ago, Lord Mandelson called the tax ‘good for business’, but MPs’ rebellion over the tax – more than 120 have signed commons motions against the tax – could force the government into a u-turn. MPs are now hoping that there will be some element of relief introduced at next week’s pre budget report following their campaign and the Property Week and British Property Federation’s campaigns against the tax. This week, the BPF will make a final representation to the government over empty rates. The Urban Regeneration Companies executives group, led by Leicester chief John Nicholls, have also submitted a dossier of evidence on demolitions caused by empty rates. Labour MP Chris Mullin, with colleague John Cummings, have also met with the Treasury recently and Brown suggested they had ‘got somewhere’. He said: ‘I do think the government could look at granting relief. We are in a position where people are pulling buildings down, which is an unintentional but destructive consequence of this, and the way to avert that is to grant relief.’Eric Pickles, Tory local government spokesman, said: ‘The fact Labour’s own Chief Whip is leading this tax revolt shows just how damaging this levy is.’BPF director Peter Cosmetatos said: ‘It would be highly cynical to offer relief just to areas where the government may lose seats. But the chancellor has an opportunity to make a small tax concession that would hugely help businesses survive the current economic bloodbath. It is vital he uses the pre-Budget report to do this, sending a clear message that the government wants to support, not hinder, recovery.’last_img read more

They’ll never walk alone

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