Pogoy excited to play alongside defensive idol Reyes

first_imgBrad Pitt wins his first acting Oscar as awards get underway Smart hosts first 5G-powered esports exhibition match in PH Chinese-manned vessel unsettles Bohol town Pumaren pushes Warriors to end UAAP Season on high note Where did they go? Millions left Wuhan before quarantine Sports Related Videospowered by AdSparcRead Next BREAKING: Solicitor General asks SC to forfeit ABS CBN’s franchise We are young Smart’s Siklab Saya: A multi-city approach to esports MOST READ Taiwan minister boards cruise ship turned away by Japan PLAY LIST 01:31Taiwan minister boards cruise ship turned away by Japan01:33WHO: ‘Global stocks of masks and respirators are now insufficient’01:01WHO: now 31,211 virus cases in China 102:02Vitamin C prevents but doesn’t cure diseases like coronavirus—medic03:07’HINDI PANG-SPORTS LANG!’03:03SILIP SA INTEL FUND PH among economies most vulnerable to virus Don’t miss out on the latest news and information. View comments TNT Draft pick Roger Pogoy. Photo by Tristan Tamayo/INQUIRER.netOf all of the seven former Tamaraws selected in the 2016 PBA Rookie Draft, only he will get the chance of still being under the guidance of incoming TNT coach Nash Racela.“Sobrang saya kasi nakamit ko na yung pangarap ko at coach ko pa si coach Nash sa TNT,” said the Cebuano shoote, who was picked by the KaTropa in the Gilas round of the draft proceedings.ADVERTISEMENT EDITORS’ PICK 30 Filipinos from Wuhan quarantined in Capas But what excites Pogoy more is the prospect of him being mentored by his idol Ryan Reyes.“Since high school pa ako sa Cebu, gusto ko na talaga yung laro nya,” he shared, saying he tries to emulate the things Reyes does on the court. “Defender din sya eh, kaya ginagaya ko siya minsan.”FEATURED STORIESSPORTSGinebra teammates show love for SlaughterSPORTSWe are youngSPORTSCone plans to speak with Slaughter, agentThough still on a cloud nine, Pogoy knows that it’s the start of the hard work and he hopes to bring the same intensity he did in the amateur level as he makes the transition to the pros.“Maibibigay ko sa TNT yung aggressiveness ko at yung depensa ko. Yun naman yung strength ko eh,” he said. Mainland China virus cases exceed 40,000; deaths rise to 908last_img read more

Castro absence not an excuse for loss, says Reyes

first_imgAzkals’ heart Taiwan minister boards cruise ship turned away by Japan PLAY LIST 01:31Taiwan minister boards cruise ship turned away by Japan01:33WHO: ‘Global stocks of masks and respirators are now insufficient’01:01WHO: now 31,211 virus cases in China 102:02Vitamin C prevents but doesn’t cure diseases like coronavirus—medic03:07’HINDI PANG-SPORTS LANG!’03:03SILIP SA INTEL FUND “I don’t know what Jayson is feeling right now, so I guess it’s up to him when he feels ready.  It’s only him who knows what’s happening with his body, so he told me after two games, he’ll be ready,” he said.“He just started practicing again, maybe a couple of practice. We can’t rely on Jayson to save our season. Everybody from the team, we have to do our part to make this conference a successful one.”Sports Related Videospowered by AdSparcRead Next Don’t miss out on the latest news and information. Smart’s Siklab Saya: A multi-city approach to esports Where did they go? Millions left Wuhan before quarantine We are young Chinese-manned vessel unsettles Bohol town PH among economies most vulnerable to virus 30 Filipinos from Wuhan quarantined in Capas As fate of VFA hangs, PH and US forces take to the skies for exercise Shanghai officials reveal novel coronavirus transmission modes TNT’s Ranidel de Ocampo. PBA IMAGESNot even the absence of Jayson Castro could pass as a viable excuse for TNT coach Josh Reyes following the KaTropa’s opening-game loss to Rain or Shine on Wednesday night.Reyes, who acted as a temporary head coach for TNT with Nash Racela tied up with Far Eastern University, said not having Castro was not the reason why the KaTropa dropped a 101-87 decision to the Elasto Painters.ADVERTISEMENT EDITORS’ PICK Smart hosts first 5G-powered esports exhibition match in PH MOST READ “It’s really an adjustment. Everybody is used to playing with Jayson, but it shouldn’t be an excuse for everybody including myself,” said Reyes.“We should’ve done a better job defensively because I felt that if we could’ve made enough stops, enough defensive rebounds, the result could be different.”FEATURED STORIESSPORTSGinebra teammates show love for SlaughterSPORTSWe are youngSPORTSCone plans to speak with Slaughter, agentThe 30-year-old Castro is taking a much-needed rest after playing nonstop starting from his national team duties in 2013 up to the 2016 Governors’ Cup semifinals where TNT lost to Meralco in five games early last month.According to Reyes, Castro, who is also expected to miss TNT’s game against Barangay Ginebra on Sunday, is set to make his season debut on Dec. 2 against Blackwater. Mainland China virus cases exceed 40,000; deaths rise to 908 View commentslast_img read more

GlobalPort deputy on collapse: ‘We stopped playing defense’

first_imgShanghai officials reveal novel coronavirus transmission modes Globalport assistant coach Cholo Villanueva said it was his team’s lackadaisical defensive effort in the final period that ultimately led to their 101-99 loss to Phoenix. “We stopped playing defense, we stopped running up and down in transition,” said Villanueva as the Batang Pier slipped to 3-3 while the Fuel Masters leapfrogged them to a 4-3 slate. “This helped them get easy points and defensive rebounds.”FEATURED STORIESSPORTSGinebra teammates show love for SlaughterSPORTSWe are youngSPORTSFreddie Roach: Manny Pacquiao is my Muhammad AliPhoenix stole the ball seven times and forced GlobalPort to 19 turnovers as the Fuel Masters took full advantage of th Batang Pier’s miscues to convert 18 points off turnovers. Rebounding was also an issue for GlobalPort with the Fuel Masters taking a distinct 56-48 advantage and converting 25 second chance points.  Senators to proceed with review of VFA Chinese-manned vessel unsettles Bohol town Taiwan minister boards cruise ship turned away by Japan PLAY LIST 01:31Taiwan minister boards cruise ship turned away by Japan01:33WHO: ‘Global stocks of masks and respirators are now insufficient’01:01WHO: now 31,211 virus cases in China 102:02Vitamin C prevents but doesn’t cure diseases like coronavirus—medic03:07’HINDI PANG-SPORTS LANG!’03:03SILIP SA INTEL FUND EDITORS’ PICK PH among economies most vulnerable to virus Smart hosts first 5G-powered esports exhibition match in PH Smart’s Siklab Saya: A multi-city approach to esports View comments Chinese-manned vessel unsettles Bohol town Don’t miss out on the latest news and information. “Of course it’s unfortunate that we ended this year with a loss but we always look forward to the next game to bounce back,” said Villanueva who filled-in for head coach Franz Pumaren. “So we’ll just learn from this and hopefully bounce back in the next game.”Sports Related Videospowered by AdSparcRead Next Fajardo doesn’t mind producing less numbers with SMB winning As fate of VFA hangs, PH and US forces take to the skies for exercise MOST READ Tristan Tamayo/INQUIRER.netChristmas may be over but GlobalPort experienced what it’s like getting a visit from the Grinch. On Wednesday, the Batang Pier was having their way against Phoenix but nothing would have prepared them against the Fuel Masters’ furious fourth-quarter fightback.ADVERTISEMENT Where did they go? Millions left Wuhan before quarantine We are younglast_img read more

Species evolve more than twice as fast at poles as in tropics: study

first_imgConsidering the swarming biodiversity at the equator, and the lack of diversity near the poles, scientists have long assumed that species evolve more rapidly in warm waters. But a new study of the evolutionary development of 30,000 fish species has turned that idea on its head.Biologists found that a fish species in the tropics split into a new species on average every 10 to 20 million years. But near the poles, that average rate is roughly every four million years – more than twice as fast.The reason may be the far more extreme and less stable climatic conditions found near the poles. This results in more frequent extinctions, which clears out species diversity and empties ecological niches, setting the stage for the next new burst of species formation in other groups of organisms.But if species form faster at the poles than in the tropics, why isn’t there greater biodiversity in the Arctic and Antarctic than at the equator? One possibility: while speciation is more rapid at the poles, extinctions may be more numerous too. But this still isn’t clear, and more research will be needed to find out. Coral reef ecosystem at Palmyra Atoll National Wildlife Refuge. Species diversity in the tropics is far greater than that found at the poles, but scientists have found that the rate of speciation for fish is much faster in polar regions. Image by Jim Maragos / U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service.Picture a healthy, tropical coral reef. Lionfish, parrotfish, and clownfish dart through cerulean waters, swimming over a veritable rainbow of corals. Now picture the Arctic and Antarctic oceans. If you struggle to come up with anything besides a cold, dark abyss, where very little ever happens ecologically or evolutionarily, you’re not alone. But, you’d also be wrong.The tropics are home to a dazzling array of biodiversity, the temperate zones less so, with the poles often evoking words like “barren” and “desolate.” Biologists describe this continuum as the latitudinal diversity gradient, with species densities lowest in the Arctic and Antarctic, and highest around the equator. This concept has long guided our thinking about Earth’s biodiversity, informing widely held assumptions that the tropics have higher biodiversity because species form there faster.That’s why new research, published in the journal Nature, is so shocking to the scientific community.The clichéd image of the Arctic and Antarctic oceans is of evolutionarily starved ecosystems. Scientists have now shown this to be far from the truth, at least among fish species. Photo credit: JEROME LESSARD/PHOTOGRAPHER on Visual Hunt / CC BY-NCWhen researchers compared the evolutionary relationships of more than 30,000 fish species, they found that the rate of speciation – the time it takes for one species to split and become two separate species – was significantly higher at the poles than in the tropics. It’s a discovery that upends our preconceived notions about global biodiversity development.In their analysis, researchers found that a fish species in the tropics split into a new species on average every 10 to 20 million years. But near the poles, that average rate was more like every four million years – more than twice as fast.The reason why this is, says Daniel Rabosky, lead author of the study and evolutionary biologist at the University of Michigan, isn’t yet clear.A juvenile Onespot Demoiselle. The big question researchers are facing: if the rate of speciation is faster in polar regions, compared to the tropics, why is biodiversity so much greater at the equator than it is up north? Does the rate of species extinction play a major role? Image by zsispeo found on Flickr.It’s unlikely, says Rabosky, that anything about the physical environment itself, such as low surface temperatures, is leading to a faster rate of speciation at the poles. “Certainly, [speciation] should be faster due to temperature in the tropics,” he explains. “The accepted wisdom is that warmer places should have more things going on than cold places.” Rather, he thinks what’s ultimately driving this suped-up speciation has more to do with extinction.The fossil record shows that there is an explosion of species diversity right after a big extinction event, such as the asteroid impact 65 million years ago that put an end to the dinosaurs and gave mammals their big break. This same rapid rebound effect could also be happening at the poles, given their lack of climatic stability. Freshwater lakes in northern Canada, where ice sheets once sat, seem to backup Rabosky’s hypothesis; researchers there have witnessed rapid speciation among fish, occurring in a blink of an eye on a geologic time-scale.“Clearing out of species diversity sets the stage for a new burst of species formation in other groups of organisms,” Rabosky explains.Divers under Arctic ice find little of the startling biodiversity seen on tropical coral reefs. But nonetheless, evolution is fast at work in polar regions. Photo credit: bbcworldservice on Visualhunt.com / CC BY-NC.Brian Bowen, a researcher at the University of Hawaii’s Institute of Marine Biology, agrees. The Arctic and Antarctic see extreme variations in conditions not only from year to year, but in terms of glacial cycles, too. “Those places get locked up in ice and then they thaw; that opens up a lot of new habitat at the end of every ice age,” Bowen says. “If there’s one thing we understand about species flux and high levels of speciation, it’s that when you open up new habitat you tend to get rapid speciation.”Bowen points to similar rapid species development in the Galapagos and Hawaiian Islands which support this theory; both archipelagos formed from volcanic lava that welled up in the middle of the ocean, far from any continental land mass, and both areas have a high number of endemic species. “Something gets in there, where there are all kinds of unused niches, and they speciate rapidly.”But if species are forming faster at the poles than in the tropics, why isn’t there more biodiversity in the Arctic and Antarctic compared to near the equator? Possibly, while speciation is faster up north, then so is extinction. But that isn’t entirely clear, says Rabosky, and will require digging deeper into the fossil record.“There is no real understanding of what is regulating diversity on Earth… that’s one of the big frontiers here,” he says.Chaetodon fasciatus, Red Sea raccoon butterflyfish, and Diagonal butterflyfish. Scientists now possess an evolutionary snapshot of fish speciation rates globally, but they don’t have enough data to conclude how speciation might occur in the future near the poles and in the tropics among fish and other animal and plant species. Image by Artur Rydzewski found on Flickr.Though not his preferred take, Rabosky suggests the Arctic and Antarctic could currently be undergoing a sudden explosion of diversity, and that if we were to look 20 million years into the future, the latitudinal diversity gradient could have all but disappeared. However, our current lack of knowledge makes it too difficult to determine whether the rate of speciation at the poles has increased or decreased over time.Another unanswered question: is the rapid polar speciation seen in fish also occurring in other animals and plants? Does it apply to mollusks, algae, and crustaceans? And what about non-marine life? Birds, for example, don’t seem to show the same relationship between latitude and species formation, while mammals have never been studied in this way.“This is a fascinating wrinkle on the whole issue of the origins of biodiversity,” says Bowen.Atlantic cod can be found as far north as the Arctic Ocean. Polar regions have low fish diversity, but far northern waters are now thought to be the site of rapid fish speciation. Photo credit: Image by Joachim S. Müller found on Flickr. Article published by Glenn Scherer Animals, Arctic Animals, Biodiversity, Biodiversity Hotspots, Biology, Climate Change And Biodiversity, Climate Change And Extreme Weather, Conservation, Ecology, Ecosystems, Environment, Evolution, Extinction, Extreme Weather, Fish, Green, Habitat, New Species, Polar Regions, Research, Tropics, Weather, Wildlife center_img Popular in the CommunitySponsoredSponsoredOrangutan found tortured and decapitated prompts Indonesia probeEMGIES17 Jan, 2018We will never know the full extent of what this poor Orangutan went through before he died, the same must be done to this evil perpetrator(s) they don’t deserve the air that they breathe this has truly upset me and I wonder for the future for these wonderful creatures. So called ‘Mankind’ has a lot to answer for we are the only ones ruining this world I prefer animals to humans any day of the week.What makes community ecotourism succeed? In Madagascar, location, location, locationScissors1dOther countries should also learn and try to incorporateWhy you should care about the current wave of mass extinctions (commentary)Processor1 DecAfter all, there is no infinite anything in the whole galaxy!Infinite stupidity, right here on earth.The wildlife trade threatens people and animals alike (commentary)Anchor3dUnfortunately I feel The Chinese have no compassion for any living animal. They are a cruel country that as we knowneatbeverything that moves and do not humanily kill these poor animals and insects. They have no health and safety on their markets and they then contract these diseases. Maybe its karma maybe they should look at the way they live and stop using animals for all there so called remedies. DisgustingConservationists welcome China’s wildlife trade banThobolo27 JanChina has consistently been the worlds worst, “ Face of Evil “ in regards our planets flora and fauna survival. In some ways, this is nature trying to fight back. This ban is great, but the rest of the world just cannot allow it to be temporary, because history has demonstrated that once this coronavirus passes, they will in all likelihood, simply revert to been the planets worst Ecco Terrorists. Let’s simply not allow this to happen! How and why they have been able to degrade this planets iconic species, rape the planets rivers, oceans and forests, with apparent impunity, is just mind boggling! Please no more.Probing rural poachers in Africa: Why do they poach?Carrot3dOne day I feel like animals will be more scarce, and I agree with one of my friends, they said that poaching will take over the world, but I also hope notUpset about Amazon fires last year? Focus on deforestation this year (commentary)Bullhorn4dLies and more leisSponsoredSponsoredCoke is again the biggest culprit behind plastic waste in the PhilippinesGrapes7 NovOnce again the article blames companies for the actions of individuals. It is individuals that buy these products, it is individuals that dispose of them improperly. If we want to change it, we have to change, not just create bad guys to blame.Brazilian response to Bolsonaro policies and Amazon fires growsCar4 SepThank you for this excellent report. I feel overwhelmed by the ecocidal intent of the Bolsonaro government in the name of ‘developing’ their ‘God-given’ resources.U.S. allocates first of $30M in grants for forest conservation in SumatraPlanet4dcarrot hella thick ;)Melting Arctic sea ice may be altering winds, weather at equator: studyleftylarry30 JanThe Arctic sea ice seems to be recovering this winter as per the last 10-12 years, good news.Malaysia has the world’s highest deforestation rate, reveals Google forest mapBone27 Sep, 2018Who you’re trying to fool with selective data revelation?You can’t hide the truth if you show historical deforestation for all countries, especially in Europe from 1800s to this day. WorldBank has a good wholesome data on this.Mass tree planting along India’s Cauvery River has scientists worriedSurendra Nekkanti23 JanHi Mongabay. Good effort trying to be objective in this article. I would like to give a constructive feedback which could help in clearing things up.1. It is mentioned that planting trees in village common lands will have negative affects socially and ecologically. There is no need to even have to agree or disagree with it, because, you also mentioned the fact that Cauvery Calling aims to plant trees only in the private lands of the farmers. So, plantation in the common lands doesn’t come into the picture.2.I don’t see that the ecologists are totally against this project, but just they they have some concerns, mainly in terms of what species of trees will be planted. And because there was no direct communication between the ecologists and Isha Foundation, it was not possible for them to address the concerns. As you seem to have spoken with an Isha spokesperson, if you could connect the concerned parties, it would be great, because I see that the ecologists are genuinely interested in making sure things are done the right way.May we all come together and make things happen.Rare Amazon bush dogs caught on camera in BoliviaCarrot1 Feba very good iniciative to be fallowed by the ranchers all overSponsoredlast_img read more

Two iconic birds make a striking comeback, but much work remains

first_imgBirdLife International has revised the information for the conservation status of more than 2,300 bird species this year.Overall, 31 species of birds were moved to lower threat categories, while 58 species were uplisted to higher threat categories.The pink pigeon, which has been downlisted to vulnerable from endangered, and the northern bald ibis, which has been downlisted to endangered from critically endangered, have shown some of the most dramatic improvements. The pink pigeon, found only on the island of Mauritius, was once nearly declared extinct. Another bird, the northern bald ibis, underwent catastrophic declines across much of its habitat in the Middle East, North Africa and Europe.But now, both species are on the path to recovery, according to the latest assessment of the world’s birds by BirdLife International, a global partnership of conservation organizations.In 2018, BirdLife, which serves as the official Red List Authority for birds for the IUCN Red List of Threatened Species, revised information on more than 2,300 bird species, based on information gathered by professional and citizen scientists, NGO staff, and birdwatchers from around the world. The assessed birds represent about 22 percent of all the world’s bird species.“These updates have varied from minor amendments to the text or map for certain species, to comprehensive revisions of the factsheets for species where new information has become available, especially in cases where the species’ threat status has changed so much that they have now been reclassified to a different Red List category,” Ian Burfield, global science coordinator at BirdLife International, told Mongabay.Overall, in this year’s assessment, BirdLife International moved 31 species of birds to less dire threat categories. (The categories range, in ascending order of threat, from “vulnerable” to “endangered” to “critically endangered.”) Of these, the pink pigeon and the northern bald ibis showed some of the most dramatic improvements.Red-headed woodpecker. Image by Andy Reago and Chrissy McClarren.Pink pigeonThe pink pigeon (Nesoenas mayeri) could have met the same fate as another Mauritian pigeon, the dodo, now extinct. But targeted conservation actions over the past 40 years have brought the species back from the brink of extinction.In the 1970s, there were only about 12 to 20 pink pigeons left on Mauritius. The bird faced a range of threats: rapid loss of forest cover; the introduction to their island of non-native predators like rats, cats, mongoose and crab-eating monkeys; and the introduction of non-native birds, which brought new pathogens and diseases into the pink pigeon population. By the 1990s, the pink pigeon was down to just nine or 10 individuals.Today, there are around 400 wild individuals, thanks to efforts like captive breeding and intensive management of the bird’s reintroduced populations and habitats. This number has remained relatively stable over the last 10 years, and the species, which was downlisted from critically endangered to endangered in 2000, has been downlisted once again, to vulnerable.“We are thrilled that this has happened,” said Vikash Tatayah, conservation director of the Mauritian Wildlife Foundation (MWF), an NGO that works closely with the country’s National Parks and Conservation Service and several international partners to protect the pink pigeon. “It took 43 years of work to get to this point, so it’s not happened overnight. This just goes to show that getting species to recover, especially in places where the ecosystem has been badly damaged, will take many, many years.”A pair of pink pigeons. Image by Mauritian Wildlife Foundation.The downlisting shows that conservation actions must continue, Tatayah said. And MWF has already set lofty goals: it wants to bring the pink pigeon population up to at least 600 individuals over the next decade. To achieve this, the MWF team has been reintroducing birds into privately held sites, in addition to other conservation efforts. Most of the previously reintroduced populations are inside government-designated protected areas.“In Mauritius there are more forests in private hands than in government hands, so we need to find ways to work with the private sector as an equal partner in restoring species,” Tatayah said.The genetic diversity of the wild birds is also currently “regrettably low,” he added. Researchers are working to resolve this issue by tapping into the captive population of pink pigeons in zoos and wildlife parks across Europe that are known to harbor greater genetic variation than the Mauritian wild population.Northern bald ibisThe northern bald ibis (Geronticus eremita), too, was driven to the brink, teetering at just 59 pairs in the 1990s due to habitat loss, pesticides and hunting. Today, the species, once revered as a holy bird in ancient Egypt, has disappeared from most of its known range. The only ibis population that’s shown evidence of improvement is in Morocco.In fact, northern bald ibis numbers in Morocco have risen to 147 breeding pairs, a modern-day record, with the discovery of new breeding sites, according to BirdLife International. In the latest assessment, the northern bald ibis has been downlisted from critically endangered to endangered on the IUCN Red List.“Since my first involvement working on this extraordinary species in the early 1990s, when the trends were a series of local extinctions and overall decline, it’s an immense source of pride that the sustained but gradual increase in Morocco means that downlisting is needed,” Chris Bowden, coordinator of the AEWA Northern Bald Ibis International Working Group, said in an email. “This has been the result of the sustained efforts of the Souss-Massa National Park, the locally trained wardens, fishermen recruited from nearby villages, and the BirdLife Partners involved (GREPOM, SEO and RSPB).”A northern bald ibis. Image by D. Faulder.But it hasn’t been all good news for the bird. A tiny population of northern bald ibis in Syria has declined from three pairs in 2002 and is likely extinct now, researchers say. In fact, Morocco might be the last home to the species in the wild. The bird’s overall numbers are also still low, which means conservation efforts need to be sustained.“There is still a lot to do, including resisting development pressures in the two main Moroccan sites and maintaining all the ongoing efforts highlighted in the recently updated International Single Species Action Plan,” Bowden said. “It’s crucial that the downlisting doesn’t reduce the priority in achieving all of this, but we should congratulate in particular the Moroccan Government, and specifically the Ministry of Water and Forests [in their fight against] desertification, on this downlisting, which is a momentous endorsement of their success.”Hope for birdsOf the 31 species downlisted this year, some have moved out of the threatened or near-threatened categories altogether and are now classified as being of “least concern” — that is, they are no longer at immediate risk of extinction. These include the red-headed woodpecker (Melanerpes erythrocephalus) and Henslow’s sparrow (Passerculus henslowii), both native to North America and previously listed as “near threatened” (more dire than “least concern” but not yet in the threatened category of “vulnerable”). Henslow’s sparrow, for instance, declined due to loss of its grassland habitat over the decades. But the bird gained from the U.S. Department of Agriculture’s Conservation Reserve Program, which pays farmers to “remove environmentally sensitive land from cultivation and plant species that will improve environmental health and quality.”“Such examples are currently rarer, because the species involved are not necessarily as rare, localised or iconic, and because reversing their declines often requires changes to be made over much larger areas and to land or water or sea uses controlled by powerful policy mechanisms,” Burfield said.A Henslow’s sparrow. Image by Andy Reago and Chrissy McClarren.Other highly threatened species remain listed as critically endangered or endangered. But this isn’t necessarily bad news because it could mean that conservation actions have successfully kept them from going extinct.Overall, the downlisting of species to a lower threat category sends a hopeful message that conservation actions can work, even though they might take several decades to bear fruit. But does downlisting affect funding if the species are no longer seen as threatened as before?“There is always a risk that when you downlist a species you lose funders because funders might say that this species is now vulnerable so let’s go and protect another species that is critically endangered,” Tatayah said. “But funders should be looking to be associated with success. Downlisting is a sign of success.”Many battles remainSuccesses have been few and far between. Many of the world’s birds face a growing risk of extinction: the latest assessment moves 58 species to a higher threat categories than before. Seven hornbill species, for instance, including the great hornbill (Buceros bicornis) and rhinoceros hornbill (Buceros rhinoceros), which have both been moved from near threatened to vulnerable, are under severe threat of extinction.The straw-headed bulbul (Pycnonotus zeylanicus), uplisted from endangered to critically endangered, is being pushed to extinction by the songbird trade in Indonesia, as is the Java sparrow (Lonchura oryzivora), a popular cagebird in Southeast Asia that’s now been uplisted from vulnerable to endangered.“We, the conservation community, know very well what needs to be done to save threatened birds, and can demonstrate that with numerous examples,” Burfield said. “What we need now is a massive upscaling in resources and capacity to match the scale of the biodiversity crisis and allow us to save even more species.“And that requires political will and money.”A great hornbill. Image by Angadachappa. Article published by Shreya Dasgupta Animals, Biodiversity, Birds, Conservation, Deforestation, Endangered Species, Environment, Forests, Green, Happy-upbeat Environmental, Protected Areas, Wildlife, Wildlife Trade center_img Popular in the CommunitySponsoredSponsoredOrangutan found tortured and decapitated prompts Indonesia probeEMGIES17 Jan, 2018We will never know the full extent of what this poor Orangutan went through before he died, the same must be done to this evil perpetrator(s) they don’t deserve the air that they breathe this has truly upset me and I wonder for the future for these wonderful creatures. So called ‘Mankind’ has a lot to answer for we are the only ones ruining this world I prefer animals to humans any day of the week.What makes community ecotourism succeed? In Madagascar, location, location, locationScissors1dOther countries should also learn and try to incorporateWhy you should care about the current wave of mass extinctions (commentary)Processor1 DecAfter all, there is no infinite anything in the whole galaxy!Infinite stupidity, right here on earth.The wildlife trade threatens people and animals alike (commentary)Anchor3dUnfortunately I feel The Chinese have no compassion for any living animal. They are a cruel country that as we knowneatbeverything that moves and do not humanily kill these poor animals and insects. They have no health and safety on their markets and they then contract these diseases. Maybe its karma maybe they should look at the way they live and stop using animals for all there so called remedies. DisgustingConservationists welcome China’s wildlife trade banThobolo27 JanChina has consistently been the worlds worst, “ Face of Evil “ in regards our planets flora and fauna survival. In some ways, this is nature trying to fight back. This ban is great, but the rest of the world just cannot allow it to be temporary, because history has demonstrated that once this coronavirus passes, they will in all likelihood, simply revert to been the planets worst Ecco Terrorists. Let’s simply not allow this to happen! How and why they have been able to degrade this planets iconic species, rape the planets rivers, oceans and forests, with apparent impunity, is just mind boggling! Please no more.Probing rural poachers in Africa: Why do they poach?Carrot3dOne day I feel like animals will be more scarce, and I agree with one of my friends, they said that poaching will take over the world, but I also hope notUpset about Amazon fires last year? Focus on deforestation this year (commentary)Bullhorn4dLies and more leisSponsoredSponsoredCoke is again the biggest culprit behind plastic waste in the PhilippinesGrapes7 NovOnce again the article blames companies for the actions of individuals. It is individuals that buy these products, it is individuals that dispose of them improperly. If we want to change it, we have to change, not just create bad guys to blame.Brazilian response to Bolsonaro policies and Amazon fires growsCar4 SepThank you for this excellent report. I feel overwhelmed by the ecocidal intent of the Bolsonaro government in the name of ‘developing’ their ‘God-given’ resources.U.S. allocates first of $30M in grants for forest conservation in SumatraPlanet4dcarrot hella thick ;)Melting Arctic sea ice may be altering winds, weather at equator: studyleftylarry30 JanThe Arctic sea ice seems to be recovering this winter as per the last 10-12 years, good news.Malaysia has the world’s highest deforestation rate, reveals Google forest mapBone27 Sep, 2018Who you’re trying to fool with selective data revelation?You can’t hide the truth if you show historical deforestation for all countries, especially in Europe from 1800s to this day. WorldBank has a good wholesome data on this.Mass tree planting along India’s Cauvery River has scientists worriedSurendra Nekkanti23 JanHi Mongabay. Good effort trying to be objective in this article. I would like to give a constructive feedback which could help in clearing things up.1. It is mentioned that planting trees in village common lands will have negative affects socially and ecologically. There is no need to even have to agree or disagree with it, because, you also mentioned the fact that Cauvery Calling aims to plant trees only in the private lands of the farmers. So, plantation in the common lands doesn’t come into the picture.2.I don’t see that the ecologists are totally against this project, but just they they have some concerns, mainly in terms of what species of trees will be planted. And because there was no direct communication between the ecologists and Isha Foundation, it was not possible for them to address the concerns. As you seem to have spoken with an Isha spokesperson, if you could connect the concerned parties, it would be great, because I see that the ecologists are genuinely interested in making sure things are done the right way.May we all come together and make things happen.Rare Amazon bush dogs caught on camera in BoliviaCarrot1 Feba very good iniciative to be fallowed by the ranchers all overSponsoredlast_img read more