Perland shows faith in big sheds

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GUEST COLUMN: Crisis gives us time to reflect, UAlbany student writes

first_imgSome say the COVID-19 global pandemic is really “ruining” their lives. I agree that the pandemic has caused drastic changes in everyone’s life.GAZETTE COVID-19 COVERAGEThe Daily Gazette is committed to keeping our community safe and informed and is offering our COVID-19 coverage to you free.Our subscribers help us bring this information to you. Please consider a subscription at DailyGazette.com/Subscribe to help support these efforts.Thank YouBut instead of viewing my life as being ruined, I like to believe that this has opened my eyes. My eyes are finally seeing the world in a new light. For one, we have been truly privileged and, at times, ungrateful.Students my age are complaining about having classes online and having to remain at home or in their off-campus apartments.But what about the young adults all over the world who can’t attend college at all?People are annoyed that they can’t go to the gym or salons. But what about the people who are forced to live in hiding due to their country’s dictator?I know I am taking a dramatic approach. But seriously, we have been far too ignorant for far too long. There are so many things to be grateful for during this time.Be grateful for having your family and loved ones.Be grateful for having a roof over your head and food to eat. Be grateful for your health.As I have started to incorporate these new mindsets into my present daily life, I’ve been spending more time with my family. I had forgotten how important quality family time was, as I was always “too busy.”It always seemed there’d be enough time for that. Did we all believe the coronavirus couldn’t touch us? That we, as Americans, were untouchable?When I think about what it’s been like for me being in self-quarantine, I’ve found myself guilty of these mindsets at times.Yes, I wish I could go get my nails done and go to the gym with my friends. I wish I could still go out on the weekends or shop at the mall.But once I really reflected on everything, it all started to click for me.People are dying. People have to go home to their abusers or to no home at all.Kids are starving because they relied on school meals to get fed. People are losing their jobs and unable to support their families. The people who still do have jobs are risking their own health, every day for the rest of us. And that’s just in our own country.  But as this pandemic has proven to many families, life is unpredictable and shouldn’t be something we take for granted. Just the other night, my grandmother, mother and I, created our own at-home salon. We did our own nails and face masks while reminiscing on past times together.When the night had ended, I was no longer thinking about how much I wished I could go to the mall or the nail salon down the street.I was thinking about how, in this moment, being with them was all I needed.  I never really thought about what a need and a want truly are. But for so long, I’ve considered so many things necessary that truly are not.I am one of the lucky ones going through this. These “inconveniences” everyone keeps talking about have become something I want to personally start considering blessings.All of these precautions being taken are not inconveniences if it means saving someone’s life. center_img So, the lessons of the COVID-19 virus, to me, is that life in the U.S. is a privilege that for so long so many of us have forgotten.The lesson is that we should be grateful for what we have and not what we don’t.The lesson is that we should all look at this as a wakeup call, because what happens when the virus is overcome and life goes back to normal?Will we go back to the way things were, along with the mindsets we’ve all carried for so long? Or will we reflect on this terrifying period of our lives as a chance to change?A chance to be better. Not only ourselves, but as a country. Alexis Varamogiannis, a native of Syracuse who grew up in Loudonville, is a second semester junior at the University at Albany. She is a communications and sociology major, with a minor in journalism. GAZETTE COVID-19 COVERAGEThe Daily Gazette is committed to keeping our community safe and informed and is offering our COVID-19 coverage to you free.Our subscribers help us bring this information to you. Please consider a subscription at DailyGazette.com/Subscribe to help support these efforts.Thank YouMore from The Daily Gazette:EDITORIAL: Thruway tax unfair to working motoristsEDITORIAL: Urgent: Today is the last day to complete the censusHIGH NOTES: PPEs, fighting hunger, backpacks and supplies for kidsEDITORIAL: No chickens in city without strong regsEDITORIAL: Don’t repeal bail reform law; Fix it the right way Categories: Editorial, OpinionFor The Daily GazetteAs I’ve been stuck in my adolescent bedroom for the last couple days, I’ve had a lot of time to reflect on the entirety of our country’s current crisis.last_img read more

On The Beat

first_imgIn The Baby’s ShoeA Riverhead man came up with an original way to hide his stash — inside a baby’s shoe. At least that’s what Southampton Town Police said.Kilder Ortega-Dubon, 28, was stopped along Lake Avenue in Riverside on March 5. Police said he did not have a valid registration. As it turned out, it had been suspended twice. Police searched the vehicle and said they found a clear plastic bag containing a white powdery substance believed to be cocaine, as well as some marijuana inside a small shoe inside the center console. No, the baby wasn’t wearing it at the time.Live WireResidents of a Wading River neighborhood were lucky to escape disaster on March 6 when a live power line on a watery street snaked out of control.A resident cutting down a tree was the culprit, Riverhead Town Police said. A branch from the falling tree clipped a power line on Sylvan Drive and fires broke out in several neighborhood houses.The Wading River Fire Department was called in shortly after 1 PM. The chief reportedly then called Riverhead, Manorville, Ridge, and Sound Beach fire departments to assist.Finally, PSEG-LI cut power to the area after being notified about the mishap.Firefighters went door-to-door to ensure other fires weren’t smoldering within houses on the block. Sharelast_img read more

Lady Mariners Hoping For The best

first_img Southampton, NY – 5/4/18 – Southampton Varsity softball vs. East Hampton in Southampton, NY May 4, 2018. (Photo by Gordon M. Grant) Southampton, NY – 5/4/18 – Southampton Varsity softball vs. East Hampton in Southampton, NY May 4, 2018. (Photo by Gordon M. Grant) Southampton, NY – 5/4/18 – Southampton Varsity softball vs. East Hampton in Southampton, NY May 4, 2018. (Photo by Gordon M. Grant) Southampton, NY – 5/4/18 – Southampton Varsity softball vs. East Hampton in Southampton, NY May 4, 2018. (Photo by Gordon M. Grant) Southampton, NY – 5/4/18 – Southampton Varsity softball vs. East Hampton in Southampton, NY May 4, 2018. (Photo by Gordon M. Grant) Southampton, NY – 5/4/18 – Southampton Varsity softball vs. East Hampton in Southampton, NY May 4, 2018. (Photo by Gordon M. Grant) Southampton, NY – 5/4/18 – Southampton Varsity softball vs. East Hampton in Southampton, NY May 4, 2018. (Photo by Gordon M. Grant) Southampton, NY – 5/4/18 – Southampton Varsity softball vs. East Hampton in Southampton, NY May 4, 2018. (Photo by Gordon M. Grant) Southampton, NY – 5/4/18 – Southampton Varsity softball vs. East Hampton in Southampton, NY May 4, 2018. (Photo by Gordon M. Grant)center_img Southampton, NY – 5/4/18 – Southampton Varsity softball vs. East Hampton in Southampton, NY May 4, 2018. (Photo by Gordon M. Grant) Southampton, NY – 5/4/18 – Southampton Varsity softball vs. East Hampton in Southampton, NY May 4, 2018. (Photo by Gordon M. Grant) Southampton, NY – 5/4/18 – Southampton Varsity softball vs. East Hampton in Southampton, NY May 4, 2018. (Photo by Gordon M. Grant) With a week to go, local softball teams are involved in a mad scramble to earn playoff berths, with Westhampton, Hampton Bays, Southampton, and East Hampton all playing make or break games.It’s been years since the Lady Bonackers and Lady Mariners faced off in a make or break softball game, and last Friday both teams delivered for the loyal fans that have waited so long.Yes, the Lady Mariners, playing at home, emerged victorious, by the slimmest of margins, a 1-0 score. But there were only winners on the field on this day.Sam Wesnofske, Southampton’s senior all-star pitcher, turned in a superhuman effort against East Hampton, going the distance and striking out 17 batters. Caroline Wetter’s single in the fourth drove in Stella Schoenberg for the only run of the game.It was only one of the nail biters contested last week in what has become one of the most competitive seasons ever for East End teams.Southampton, like so many of the tightly bunched teams in the 24-team League VII, wants a playoff berth. The Lady Mariners took an important step on May 3, knocking off Westhampton 6-5.Leah Sellinger hit a walk-off single to score Emma Wesnofske and lead Southampton in Suffolk VII. The always reliable Wesnofske struck out 13 and also went yard twice. Sellinger hit a walk-off single to score Emma Wesnofske with the winning run.The two wins upped Southampton’s record to 9-6 — good enough for a playoff berth? Not necessarily. Section 11, the governing body of public high school athletics, instituted a ratings system similar to one used in football. Southampton did not catapult ahead of the Lady Hurricanes in the point system despite the victory. It uses weighted averages and strength of opponents to choose those teams most deserving of a playoff berth. It is deeply flawed. Just ask coach Tania Ciancino if the Lady Mariners are denied a spot.Westhampton, playing at home crushed 12-0 on May 2 in a must-win game. Lauren Ramos went 3-for-4 and McKinley Skala went 3-for-3 to lead Westhampton in Suffolk VII. Angie Acampora struck out eight in a five-inning one-hitter.Westhampton, despite an inferior 7-7 won-lost record, has a rating of 134.8, and as of the last calculations provided by Section 11, Southampton sits at 113.7. Both teams are in Class A, and there may not be room for both in the playoffs, which begin May 14.That’s because Hampton Bays (9-6, 129.6 rating) defeated Southampton, 5-3, at Red Creek Park on May 1. Then, they pulled out a critical victory three days later when Amelia Kozuchowski’s two-out base hit drove in Katie Picataggio with the winning run against Islip. Hampton Bays had a tough encounter at East Islip on May 8 and finishes at Mercy on May 11. Even with two losses, Hampton Bays may be sitting in the catbird seat.Southampton played Hauppauge (11-5) at home on May 8 and plays Rocky Point (5-10) on May 11 and travels to Bayport/Blue Point (2-8) on May 10. All the games are slated to begin at 4:30 PM.The clock has finally run out on East Hampton. The locals have two home games left, May 10 versus East Islip and May 11 against Mattituck (4:30 PM).Riverhead, a Class AA team competing in League II, has lost three in a row. On May 2, the Lady Waves lost a heartbreaker at Bayshore 3-2. Sachem beat the locals 6-2 a day earlier.The Waves (3-5) have three games left as of this writing: at home against Whitman (7-4) on May 7 and Northport May 10, and at Lindenhurst (6-3)(0-9) on May 9.rmurphy@indyeastend.com Share Southampton, NY – 5/4/18 – Southampton Varsity softball vs. East Hampton in Southampton, NY May 4, 2018. (Photo by Gordon M. Grant) Southampton, NY – 5/4/18 – Southampton Varsity softball vs. East Hampton in Southampton, NY May 4, 2018. (Photo by Gordon M. Grant) Southampton, NY – 5/4/18 – Southampton Varsity softball vs. East Hampton in Southampton, NY May 4, 2018. (Photo by Gordon M. Grant)last_img read more

Korea Eximbank Signs MOU with KR on Cooperation in Shipbuilding

first_imgThe Export-Import Bank of Korea (Korea Eximbank) has concluded an MOU for ‘Cooperation in the Areas of Shipbuilding and Offshore Plants’ with Korea Register of Shipping (KR) at its Yeouido headquarters.The MOU commits Korea Eximbank to enlist KR’s ship classification service in ship transactions involving the bank’s financing, while KR is to provide technical consulting on ships and offshore plants. The two institutions would also cooperate in overseas projects and in employee training.Korea Eximbank plans to use KR’s expertise to increase its support for environment-friendly ships, while KR seeks to accelerate its overseas expansion under Korea Eximbank’s support.Executive Director Hong Young-pyo of the Export Credit Group at Korea Eximbank remarked at the signing ceremony, “Korea Eximbank will contribute to the development of the shipbuilding and maritime industries by devising more sophisticated ship finance solutions, based on a convergence of finance and technology.” Executive Vice President Mah Jin-sub of KR reciprocated, “Through cooperation with Korea Eximbank, KR will do its utmost to help bring about a recovery of the embattled shipbuilding and maritime industries.”Korea Register of Shipping (KR), a non-profit ship classification society, was established in June 1960 and is a member of the International Association of Classification Societies (IACS, comprised of ship classification societies in 13 countries including the US, UK, and France).[mappress]Press release, May 24, 2013last_img read more

EDA puts industry under the microscope

first_imgThe recently-published fifth edition of the European Demolition Industry Report provides an overview of Europe’s demolition industry from data gathered in the past 12 months, including information and forecasts from contractors themselves.#*#*Show Fullscreen*#*# All the data collected for the EDA’s European Demolition Industry Report is from demolition contractors themselvesPublished by the European Demolition Association (EDA), it contains questions not asked in previous years and features three countries – Denmark, Ireland and Russia – that are taking part for the first time.All data is collected directly from demolition contractors from all over Europe, through an online survey, translated into several European languages.The European Demolition Industry Report 2019 is available at http://www.europeandemolition.org/industryreportAlso new from the EDA is a special 116-page book commemorating 40 years of the association, while the dates of the EDA Convention for 2020 have been confirmed as June 4 to 6. It will be held in Belgrade, Serbia.last_img read more

I pick me

first_imgSubscribe now for unlimited access Get your free guest access  SIGN UP TODAY Stay at the forefront of thought leadership with news and analysis from award-winning journalists. Enjoy company features, CEO interviews, architectural reviews, technical project know-how and the latest innovations.Limited access to building.co.ukBreaking industry news as it happensBreaking, daily and weekly e-newsletters To continue enjoying Building.co.uk, sign up for free guest accessExisting subscriber? LOGIN Subscribe to Building today and you will benefit from:Unlimited access to all stories including expert analysis and comment from industry leadersOur league tables, cost models and economics dataOur online archive of over 10,000 articlesBuilding magazine digital editionsBuilding magazine print editionsPrinted/digital supplementsSubscribe now for unlimited access.View our subscription options and join our communitylast_img read more

PCN duo shine in solar project

first_imgThe contract includes Customs clearance and domestic trucking, as well as sea freight, airfreight and land transportation services for the 10 MW power plant, which is located in the Aqaba Special Economic Zone.The project, which also includes the construction of a 6 km long transmission line connecting to a National Electric Power Company (NEPCO) substation in Aqaba’s thermal power station, is part of Jordan’s energy programme, which aims to increase the country’s renewable energy contribution to 10 percent by 2020.Pictured below is the first shipment to be delivered to the site. Shipping, Customs clearance and final delivery to the project site was handled by Grand Arabia Forwarding; while Fortune International cooperated with the project’s main engineering, procurement and construction (EPC) contractor.  www.grandarabia.comwww.fortuneitaly.itwww.projectcargonetwork.comlast_img read more

Maths and science bursaries up for grabs

first_imgSOUTH AFRICA – Johannesburg Stock pictures, Sasol .Pictures by Simphiwe Mbokazi/African News Agency/ANA Sasol invites high-performing mathematics and science pupils currently in Grade 12 to apply for all-inclusive bursaries to study engineering, science and accounting degrees at approved public universities and universities of technology.The Sasol bursary covers costs such as tuition fees, accommodation, meals, textbooks and pocket money. Bursars also receive allowances for study tools such as laptops and calculators.Sasol is looking for pupils who want to study towards a B Eng or B Sc Eng in various engineering disciplines, BSc in Chemistry and Accounting (CA route) or pupils interested in studying instrumentation, mining survey and mechanical or electrical engineering at a university of technology.To apply, students must register online at www.sasolbursaries.com. Answer a few questions regarding your field and level of study.Applicants must log on and fill out the online application. Visit www.sasolbursaries.com for more information.Applications close on Tuesday April 30.last_img read more

OSE orders low-floor cars

first_imgHELLENIC Railways Organisation announced on January 6 that it had ordered 29 GTW2/6 low-floor articulated diesel railcars from Adtranz and Stadler AG of Switzerland to modernise and expand the Athens suburban fleet before the city hosts the 2004 Olympic Games.Valued at SFr120m, the order covers 17 metre-gauge units for the Athens – Elefsis – Korinthos corridor and 12 standard-gauge sets to work the Piraeus – Athens – Inoi route. Stadler will get around half of the contract value and Adtranz a quarter; the remaining 25% will go to local firm Hellenic Shipyards who will assemble and commission the trains under licence. olast_img read more